Happy Halloween!

 

GJ2 Glendora NLT

Price Paid: 
$850
Condition: 
New
Country of origin: 
USA
Body wood(s): 
Basswood
Neck wood: 
Maple
Fretboard: 
Maple
Fretboard Scale: 
25.5
Number of frets: 
22
Pros: 

 

The heart of this guitar is basically a Charvel So Cal/San Dimas, in terms of playability. Grover fans and loyalists asked for a bolt on neck similar to the Charvel's he created, and he gave them this.

Compound radius fingerboard, differing slightly from the Charvel, having a 10"-14" radius, and feels really comfortable. Neck contour is what you would expect from Grover Jackson, thin C shape.

Though mine was new, it was a dealer exclusive based on the older model specs, which included Gotoh non locking tuners and a Floyd style string retainer bar. I was having tuning stability issues, and upgraded it with the current spec tuners, Hipshot staggered locking tuners, which was a huge improvement. Though I believe the issue was with the condition the dealer left this guitar in, because Gotoh products are great. I would have gotten locking tuners eventually anyway.

Tremolo is a solid Gotoh 510T 2 point tremolo, I know it's definitely a Gotoh, but assuming which model based on pics.

Other dealer exclusive/ GJ2 optional features are the infinity inlays, and stainless steel jumbo frets.

Guitar is pretty light for it's size, and resonant, due to the basswood body.

Price, no matter what I say in the cons, this is essentially a custom shop guitar that was picked up new for under $900, I've paid more more mass produced imports. Even though it was being liquidated, I find the regular prices to be good, and the quality is definitely up there.

I have to say that customer service is fantastic, and one of the better qualities of a smaller operation.

Cons: 

Volume knob is in a weird spot, not as close as a Fender Strat, but halfway between there and what is foundon a Charvel. I really don't get the placing, on the San Dimas style Glendora, the knobs are where you'd expect them to be. GJ2 can make a new pickguard, out of standard material, for $35, which isn't a bad deal. Charvel pickguards won't fit, and neither will Fender and Fender licensed pickguards. Warmoth pickguard with the D-Long volume placement option is $40.

Not a huge fan of basswood. In this case the guitar feels awkward to me, in that the body is pretty bulky, it feels a little bigger than any Charvel or Fender Strat I owned, but very light. For me it's kinda like taking a sip of iced tea when you were expecting soda. Alder and ash are both options though.

Pickups. What can I say. They sound great, but for me, trying pull pinch harmonics from the bridge pickup is like milking a rock. I believe the pickup to be a GJ2 Habanero Classic, haven't been able to check that, it just doesn't have the raw power I would expect from the 17k Habanero Spicy, and the eBay dealer (they had a real store front) has not replied to any questions. It kinda sounds like a Duncan Alnico 2 Pro, but I've gotten better dynamics from the Duncan. The neck pickup I love and will keep, basically, to my ears, it sounds somewhere between like a Duncan Alnico 2 Pro and '59. If the bridge pickup is a Classic, I will probably try the Spicy, but if it turns out to be the Spicy, it's getting chucked for a Duncan. There is no specs data on what the magnets are, but I suspect the Classic both use Alnico 2, and the Spicy is either Alnico V or ceramic.

I prefer 3 way toggle switches over 3 and 5 way blade switches, this has a 3 way blade.

The condition the guitar was kept in by the dealer is just unacceptable, strings were so dirty and old they were black, and didn't even bend when removed.

Summary: 

I never had a problem with how this guitar played, neckwise, my real issue is only volume knob location, and the bridge pickup. I like playing it enough that when I tried to trade or sell it, it was to get a San Dimas styled GJ2 Glendora, with better volume placement, 3 way toggle, and a hotter bridge pickup. I've even grown to like the tone I'm getting from the basswood using the neck pickup clean and dirty, and clean on the bridge.

I've spoken to Jon Gold, the CEO of GJ2, through email and on Facebook (I've been Facebook friends with him since 2012, and thought he was just a fan of the brand lol). He's the only GJ2 customer service I've dealt with, even if you don't know him, the customer service email at GJ2's website is his, he answers it.

I'd definitely purchase another GJ2, but more than likely a non pickguard model Glendora, made of alder or ash. Would have a higher rating from me if not for the fact that I hate the knob location, or Grover's preference of basswood. Unless you wanna save some dough by paying $850, and paying $60 for new tuners if needed, I'd not purchase another Wichita Guitar Works exclusive (I believe they have 2 more left on eBay), I still think it was a steal, but it was a headache.

Overall Rating: 
4

Two Notes Engineering Torpedo Live

Analog/Digital/Hybrid: 
Digital
Pedal/Rackmount: 
Rackmount
Price Paid: 
8000 SEK / $1118
Condition: 
New
Features: 

 

For those that don't know what this is - it's a device that takes the speaker output from your amp and adds microphone and loudspeaker emulation to it, allowing you to record silently. 

 

 

  • Analogue, Reactive 100watt RMS loadbox
  • 32-bit DSP featuring: 
  • Speaker emulation via Impulse Responses
  • Microphone emulation via Impulse Responses 
  • Power amp emulation
  • EQ 
  • PC/Mac software editor
  • Additional cab models available for download/purchase 

 

Ease of Use: 
5 (easy)
Pros: 

Incredibly easy to use. Plug the speaker cable from your amplifier into the Torpedo Live and then connect the Line Out into your DAW, recording device or PA.

Very realistic and impressive sound. This really delivers!

Aside from choosing different cabs and mic's (which makes a HUGE difference), the EQ section is incredibly useful. The 5 band eq frequencies are very well chosen, allowing you to re-shape the tone very well.

Very low latency. The device has a verifiable latency of only 2.85ms.

Excellent build quality - the unit is robust and solid - the whole thing gives a feeling of quality.

For those of us wanting a home recording solution that allows us to use our existing valve amp(s), the Two Notes Torpedo Live may well be the answer.

I've been using impulse responses for home recording for years now, combining the use of a load box (attenuator) to reduce/negate the amp's signal to the speaker and provide a line signal to my DAW, which is then processed by a plugin, which can load speaker and mic impulse responses. The results are very impressive and unless you are a skilled engineer with a sound-proofed studio, will usually be much better (and above all consistent) than if you tried to mic your cab yourself.

Now - to do this and monitor the results in real time without interference from your cranked valve amp, you would need a good load box (such as a Weber Mass, TAD silencer, Palmer, THD Hotplate) and most importantly a VERY good sound interface, a DAW and a good computer. For it to work well, your sound interface and computer need to be able to process the analogue DI from the load box, apply the impulse response for microphone and cabinet and then spit it back out to your monitors - and it needs to do it quickly enough for there to be no discernible latency. Human beings have different abilities to detect latency, but anything upwards of 10ms and you are looking for trouble. You need some quite impressive hardware to achieve that - and the more tracks you have in your DAW project, the more stress you put on your system - meaning less processing power to monitor your guitar in real time.

So what the Two Notes Torpedo Live does is to take care of this procedure in one unit. It provides the load box, plus the impulse response processing for different cabs, mic's (and even power amps if you want to record with just a preamp or an overdrive pedal), and eq. And it does it all with 2.85ms of latency, which is very impressive.

The downloadable software editor is very easy to use and allows easy modification and adjustments of the setup. In addition to being able to select different cabs and microphones, there is also the ability to adjust microphone position - both the distance away from the cab and the distance from the centre. You can also select a mic position behind the cab if you desire.

The array of microphones is a list of the usual suspects - dynamic mic's such as the Sure SM57, Sennheiser MD421, ribbon mic's such as the Royer 121, Beyer 160 (damn nice mic!) and condensers such as the Neumann U87 and Blue Dragonfly.

The cabinets available are numerous - 4x12s, 4x10s, 2x12s, 1x12s from the typical sources - Marshall, Fender, Engl, Roland etc.

I got VERY impressive results from the Torpedo Live and depending on your circumstances and what gear you already have, I would strongly recommend it - OR strongly recommend one of two alternatives...

A) If you DON'T have a top-notch, studio-quality sound interface that can process and monitor very low-latency signals, and you DON'T already have a good load box that can handle your amp's output, then get the Two Notes Torpedo Live.

B) If you DON'T have a top-notch, studio-quality sound interface that can process and monitor very low-latency signals, but you DO have a good load box for your amp, then buy the Two Notes Torpedo C.A.B. instead. It does everything the Live does, but doesn't have the load box (and is thus much cheaper).

C) If you DO have a top-notch sound interface and computer and you DO have a good load box, then you are in luck - buy the Two Notes Wall of Sound III software plugin, which does everything that the flagship VB101 unit (about twice the price of the Torpedo Live) can do, but does it all in software.

IMPORTANT:
Something to bear in mind when evaluating gear like this - you have to be familiar with the sound of a mic'd amp. It won't sound like an "amp in the room" - if that's what you're expecting, you'll probably be disappointed. In addition - please use your ears rather than your ego when listening and detach yourself from any voodoo/dogma spewed by fanboys on their manufacturer's forums, as they try to justify and reassure one another about their purchases. As I said - use your ears, not your ego. Load boxes do not all suck tone (despite the protestations of fanboys of other digital gear) - Eddie Van Halen, Steve Stevens, Doug Aldrich and anybody who used a Bob Bradshaw rack in the 80s (pretty much everybody) use load boxes with their rigs.

More and more people are turning to using this method for recording - both at home and in professional studios. Even if you use a low wattage amp (even 1 watt), you'll know that if you crank it, it's blisteringly loud. You can get that cranked tone recorded by using the Two Notes.

For those that may be interested - I ended up NOT buying the Torpedo Live, as I fall into category C) above, and I was able to get the same results by using the Wall of Sound software plugin, and I'm not doing any live work.

Cons: 

Only 100 watts load box. Those people using a 100 watt valve amp will doubtless be producing way over 100 watts peak, which may overload the Torpedo Live. Bearing in mind how many 100 watt amps there are, I'm surprised they didn't opt for 150 watts (as they have in their flagship VB101 model). However, unless the "sweet spot" of your amp resides at ultra-high volume, this is not going to be a problem.

All-or-nothing attenuation. Unlike most standalone load boxes, you cannot *partially* attenuate the amp. You either get the full volume speaker signal, or you kill the speaker signal altogether. For studio recording, that's no problem, as you will probably want to monitor the pure signal from the Two Notes (and what you hear is what you get!), but for playing live, I can imagine that you might want to partially attenuate your screaming amp, yet still monitor yourself through your speaker, whilst sending the processed signal to the mixing guy, which is not possible - it's all or nothing.

Sound Quality: 
5 (excellent)
Reliability: 

Seems very well built.

Customer Support: 

Very good - I mailed their help desk with a couple of questions and they were very quick to respond and solved my problems.

Overall Rating: 
5

A / DA Flanger

Analog/Digital/Hybrid: 
Analog
Pedal/Rackmount: 
Pedal
Price Paid: 
$259.95 US
Condition: 
New
Features: 

 

 

Original signal path of the 2nd generation, (1978 - 1979) A / DA Flanger with the following changes:

The reissue is true bypass where the original was not.

The PC Board has a slightly different layout but retains the original signal path.

As of 2014 the A / DA Flanger still sports original NOS Panasonic bucket brigade chips but the supply is running down.

Ease of Use: 
3
Pros: 

It makes me feel young again. Although the A / DA Flanger wasn't released until 1976, (the reissue is of the 2nd generation '78 / '79 version), it remains the only flanger pedal that sounds like it was built to reproduce the studio flange effects used during the psychedelic '67-'69 era. The flanging effect of this era was more about a metallic shimmer or spacey mix match. Phasers sweeped or swooshed while flangers shimmered. Other flanging models released in the late '70s / early '80s, (maxon / Ibanez), used flanger tones but more phaser like controls. Their sweeping sound relates more to the '80s. I'm a "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" kinda guy. The A /DA is perfect for me.

Cons: 

The A /DA reissue may be on it's last legs. The NOS Panasonic chips are running out. I wouldn't order a new one without getting a guarentee on the chip being used.

If you were born after 1970 you may have a different take on what a flanger should do and the controls it should feature. Four knob Ibanez FL9s actually provide more direct control than the 5 knob + toggle switch of the A / DA. An Airplane or EVH swoosh type flanger, (that Eddie used more like a phaser), offers more direct control. The A / DA, (being a reissue and remaining true to the original), does not offer "next generation" control. It's true vintage quality may not work for '80s affectionados.

Sound Quality: 
5 (excellent)
Reliability: 

So far so good. I've been playing the hell out of it for a couple of months and it works as good as new.

Customer Support: 

I've had no need for customer support so far.

Overall Rating: 
5

Teese RMC5 (Wizard) Wah

Analog/Digital/Hybrid: 
Analog
Pedal/Rackmount: 
Pedal
Price Paid: 
$235 US
Condition: 
New
Features: 

 

True bypass with "fuzz friendly" technology. Karmaflux custom Inductor. RFI filtering. EFI filtering. Easily adjustable rocker tension. One switch, located beneath the rocker, that alters sweep speed and low end resonance.

Ease of Use: 
4
Pros: 

The Wizard Wah has a voice that's "one of a kind" among the wah wah pedals available for guitarists to choose from. The sweep is much shorter. High frequencies are reduced and bass frequencies are clearer. A poor but understandable comparison would be to say the vocal range of most wahs are a wide alto / 2nd soprano while the Wizard Wah is a solid tenor. I'd call the Wizard Wah the "Meatloaf" of wah wahs pedals. The shorter sweep keeps the Wizard solidly "vocal" as used in wah descriptions. No high end bite. No "Shaft". The "sweet spot" is at a lower frequency and is wider than you'd expect. The "Sweet Spot" in a wahs sweep is harmonically rich. The larger than average sweet spot of the Wizard offers up a multitude of harmonics the user can utilize to create interesting templates of vocal colorizations.  Another common descriptive used in describing a wah wahs voice is "quack". The Wizard doesn't quack like a duck. It caws like a crow. It's different. I like it.

Cons: 

The Wizard Wah does not provide what would be considered a normal wah voice. It would not be a good choice for the generic wah wah sounds a guitarist in a cover band would want available. Also, the use of output volume rather that bright high frequency at the toe down position to cut through the mix takes some getting used to. I gave the Wizard a 4 in the "ease of use" rating because of this added learning curve.

Sound Quality: 
5 (excellent)
Reliability: 

Considering the amount of time I've spent rocking Geoffreys Wah Wah pedals, as well as multiple rocker type pedals by Thomas, Dunlop, GigFX, Ernie Ball, etc., I believe RMC pedals to be the most reliable. I've only had one issue come up with an RMC product and that was a failed internal component from one of RMC's suppliers that Geoffrey immeadiatly made right at 0 cost to me. The usual Wah problems, (rocker issues, potentiometer failures, "scratchyness", etc. have never  occured with any of the RMC wahs I've owned.

Customer Support: 

Geoffrey Teese at Real McCoy Custom, RMC), provides excellent customer support. You can contact him with any questions or problem and he provides whatever you need. No one knows the Wah Wah pedal designs better than Geoffrey. Mike, over at Analogman, also swears that Geoffrey is The go to guy for anything Wah Wah related.

Overall Rating: 
5

The importance of downward pick slanting - 5 minutes that can change your life.

IF YOU PLAY GUITAR, WATCH THIS 5 MINUTE VIDEO. IT COULD CHANGE YOUR LIFE. And I sure wish I had this information 25 years ago. That said, the whole Troy Grady Cracking the Code series is excellent.

 

   

GIbson Les Paul '70s Tribute

Price Paid: 
$999.00 CAN
Condition: 
New
Country of origin: 
USA
Body wood(s): 
Mahogany w. Maple top
Neck wood: 
Mahogany
Fretboard: 
Rosewood
Fretboard Scale: 
24.75
Number of frets: 
22
Pros: 

 

 

Sound is fantastic. It roars, it squeals, it growls, all of the sounds I wanted from a Les Paul. Personally I really like the Dirty Fingers pickups, and they are really the heart of this guitar. Neck shape is comfortable, not super thin, but not a boat either. I like the faded finishes, I believe the colour is like a dark cherry, I think it looks great, and it could be buffed to a brighter shine if that is a concern. Tuners are Grovers, and do the job. Surprisingly the nut was cut properly and doesn't stick/ping at all.

Cons: 

The fret ends were sprouting rather significantly. I expected this as I am sure it sat in a warehouse during this eternal winter. I have the tools and skills to address. It took me about 45 minutes to file them even to the fretboard and re round the fret ends. If you are not comfortable with this, it would probably cost you $75 to $150 to get that work done, and it was necessary, as they were deadly sharp at the start. The gig bag is truly a piece of crap, down to the plastic zipper. I will need to get a case.

Summary: 

I love the sound of this guitar, I guess it would be safe to say that was the major selling point, and the price is not too high either. It is by no means a fancy looking Les Paul, in fact, rather plain. However, for me that holds a certain elegance in itself. I would recommend this as a guitar for playing just about any kind of dino music, it certainly gives a good sound for John Sykes (early), Gary Moore, and later Thin Lizzy type tones. Beware of the fact that as the price is budget, the finishing/setup will be rough and you will likely have to do some of the work yourself, or get it done by a professional.

Overall Rating: 
4

Kemper Profiling Amplifier (rackmount non-powerhead unit)

Head/Combo: 
Head
Price Paid: 
$2200
Condition: 
New
Country of origin: 
Germany
Tube Type: 
No power tubes
Features: 

 

 

Far too many to list, but here are the main things:

 

  • Replication of existing amplifiers via profiling.
  • Loudspeaker emulation using impulse responses.
  • Deep editing of amplifier behaviour parameters (clarity, definition, pick attack, compression, tube bias and more)
  • MIDI channel switching and expression.
  • HUGE range of effects - overdrives, modulation, delays, intelligent pitch shifting, reverbs, wah and much more.
  • Ability to make your own amplifier profiles (replicate your own amplifier).
  • Multiple independent outputs for direct recording, monitoring, to power amp, digital outs. 

 

Pros: 
  • Versatility. This unit seems to cover all the bases for studio recording, but also is very well-equipped for gigging.
  • Incredible effects. The quality is brilliant and there's pretty much everything you could need.
  • Clean sounds. Many warm, realistic sounds.
  • Light unit, but good build quality.
  • Online forums with useful advice for the (inevitable) pitfalls of a new user and a wealth of information.
  • Tweakability. There are many useful parameters that can be edited to tailor a profile (assuming the original is near what you're after). 
Cons: 
  • The supplied factory preset profiles of distorted amps are very disappointing (and the Kemper is only as good as its profiles). The way these profiles are created may work for the original user, but may not work for you. See summary for details.
  • Price. Whilst you do get a LOT for your money, the Kemper is only good value if you actually NEED all of its features, and unless you are a studio owner or jobbing session player, you probably don't. Additionally, as far as amp sounds go, the Kemper is a jack-of-all-trades but master-of-none. It's good, but still a compromise - if you're in any way a specialist, you will probably find it good, but not $2200 good.
  • Latency. Whilst the latency is acceptable for hardware monitoring (if you have a high-end sound interface that can do it) or for playing live, should you want to add your own effects in your DAW and monitor it in your mix, the combined latency of even a high-end interface and the Kemper results in a noticeable (and for me, unacceptable - YMMV) lag.
  • Occasional fake-sounding noises. Whilst this may be down to individual profiles, there are things that are fine with a real amp, such as string handling and pick noises, which come through as fake and nasty (think plugging into a hi-fi) in the KPA. It's the same with Line6's Pod series or the old Rockmans. If you adjust your playing technique to avoid it, you can get around it - you have to adapt to it, or learn to accept it.
  • Not easy to quickly get a good (IMO) sound from it. Whilst I like the depth of tweaking available, if this unit is supposed to appeal to traditional amp users, who are used to plugging in their Strat/Les Paul, turning up the volume and instantly knowing if the amp has potential, Kemper REALLY, REALLY need to do make it easier to get good results for guys who actually know what a real distorted Marshall sounds like (both recorded and in the room).
  • No official computer-based editor. For a machine this complex, that is insane. I believe a beta version of a limited 3rd party editor is now available, but only for the PC, which is ludicrous considering how many pro audio guys use Macs.
Sound Quality: 
4
Reliability: 

Seems very solidly built.

Customer Support: 

No personal experience, but Kemper's techs (and even the inventor himself) are known to be quick, courteous and very helpful. If you find glitches or technical difficulties, apparently, they will work with you to fix them.

The official Kemper forums are a very good source of information - I was able to find solutions to several noob problems very quickly be searching the forums. Just be aware that some users have their egos tied to the Kemper - watch out for the bitch-fights with AxeFX users and don't dare tell anybody that your real amp sounds better than the KPA.

Summary: 

I've been putting off checking out the Kemper Profiling Amplifier (KPA) for a couple of years now, but finally decided to give it a serious test since hearing the testimony of Wolf Hoffman - I heard him using the KPA live on Accept's tour of Stalingrad, and discovered that all the guitars on Stalingrad were made using the Kemper itself.

Also, both famous dino producer Michael Wagener and Accept producer Andy Sneap have pretty much raved about the Kemper - although despite bold claims that you can't hear the difference between the real amp and the profiled version, Hoffman, Wagener and Sneap refuse to go as far as saying they'd actually get rid of their real amps for the Kemper.

I had 3 big questions over the KPA:

  1. Does it SOUND like a real amplifier?
  2. Does it FEEL like a real amplifier.
  3. If 1 & 2 are true, can I REALLY get that sound recorded by going direct to my sound interface and DAW?

As far as my expectations go - my requirements were very simple. I'm a dino-rock player with nearly 30 years playing under my belt and very sharp and discerning ears. I've spent a fortune on amps and gear over the years, chasing good tone - both for live use and (with more difficulty) for home studio recording.

I want the sound of a real JCM800 Marshall, well-mic'd and recorded, but I do not have access to the expensive microphones, preamps or studio needed to create it myself. My current best efforts have been to use a loadbox with my real Marshall JCM800, take a line signal from that, then use a speaker cabinet simulator VST in my DAW, using speaker impulse responses. So the KPA has to beat that.

I soon discovered that the factory-supplied profiles were a very mixed bag. The clean sounds were very impressive - although I have little interest in them. Most amp simulators can pull off good clean sounds - the real test is how well they can sound like a cranked, distorted tube amplifier.

Sadly, the factory preset distorted profiles were VERY disappointing. Flat and lifeless and curiously, despite the clear difference in character between Marshall and Mesa Boogie profiles, I discovered that pinched harmonics were first of all quite difficult to get, but more alarmingly, sounded almost identical, regardless of which profile I chose. I also found that string handling noise had a spiky, nasty sound - reminiscent of the Line6 Pod series or VST guitar plugins.

Power chords and riffing were adequate, and the FEEL of playing a real amplifier was definitely there. Dynamics were there and the KPA allows you to adjust pick attack, the compression, the power tube sag. There's a limited window of usability with these parameters though, as adjusting any of them very far gives very unusable results.

This brings me to the core issue I have with the KPA. And it seems obvlous, but it cannot be overstated. The Kemper Profiling Amplifier is only as good as the profiles it uses.

I spoke to my friend (a knowledgeable KPA user) about the problems I was having with the harmonics and he explained to me that the way that a Kemper profile is created is that you set up the original amp and speaker that you intend to profile so it sounds the way you want. You set up your microphone(s) and preamps and whatever else you use in your signal chain, so the sound from the mic(s) is just right and you hook it up to the KPA. The KPA sends various strange sounds through your rig and does its magic - this is the automated process. Then you have to "refine" the process by actually playing your guitar through it.

Now, Kemper doesn't actually specify WHAT you should play here and this step is a bit mysterious. But bearing in mind how differently guitarists play. Almost all the factory distortion profiles seemed incapable of producing a screaming, early Gary Moore/John Sykes-style pinched harmonic. Power chords and riffs were ok, but dig in for a screamer and the KPA sounded like I was plugged into the microphone input of a hi-fi. But if the guys who created those profiles didn't play any screaming harmonics or whatever through their Marshall/Boogie/ENGL, how would the KPA know what it's supposed to sound like? And if you don't make pick noise/string handling noise during that phase of the profile, how could the KPA reproduce that? It's not the KPA that is at fault, it's the person who made the profile.

Herein lies what I believe is the biggest weakness of the KPA (for me at least). If you want to be able to get ALL the nuances of YOUR playing through a particular amp, you're going to need a superbly made profile (of which there are very few) or you're going to have to profile that amp yourself. Which means that aside from procuring the amp you want, you need to be able to mic the speaker so it sounds great.

This is where it starts to fall apart for me. The ENTIRE reason for me trying the KPA, is that I am a guitarist - and NOT an audio engineer. I don't have a soundproof and acoustically treated room, nor do I own a $1200 Royer 121 ribbon mic, or a Neumann or an expensive mic preamp or any of the other industry-standard recording gear that is used to create professional guitar sounds in a proper studio.

When Wolf Hoffman recorded the guitars for Stalingrad with the KPA, he profiled himself playing his own amps. Well - Wolf is not exactly short of cash or gear, and he's close personal friends with (and a lives next-door to) Michael Wagener (producer for Accept, Dokken, Skid Row etc. etc.) - who owns Wireworld studios and knows more about mic'ing amps and dino hard rock sounds than anybody else on the planet.

I ended up purchasing some 3rd party commercial profiles from theampfactory.com. This place has some quite impressive audio samples of their profiles and from what I could hear, the guy doing the demo playing sounds at least partly similar to me - a clean, dynamic hard rock player. And I got MUCH better results than anything from the factory presets.

But all the while I was testing the KPA, I kept going back to compare the sound with my own setup - an attenuated Marshall, comparing both the "in the room" sound and the direct recorded sound (the Marshall going direct and using a VST speaker simulator). Despite the good progress I'd made with the KPA, it still fell short when compared to my own amp. Both in the room and recorded direct.

I did everything I could to give the Kemper a fair shot. At one point, I actually played nothing but the KPA for two days and I actually began to adapt to it. It brought a smile to my face (playing a Blackstar Series One profile). It's funny how these things are relative. Because I was really starting to think I could go for the KPA.  Right up until I plugged my Marshall back in.

I told my KPA-using friend about this, and he urged me to profile my Marshall. He told me that I could profile a line signal from the Marshall's power amp and forget about microphones - then use the speaker sim that I currently use, and it should sound just as good as my own Marshall. I raised an eyebrow. $2200 to sound just like what I already have? AND add another 6ms latency to the chain? He then told me I could also convert the impulse response of the VST speaker simulator to a Kemper compatible format and then monitor it in hardware.

Cool. But that's $2200 to get what I already have, and to maintain the low latency I use, have to reprofile it every time I want to change an effect from my DAW? This is getting silly. Ok. So maybe I'm a specialist. But why shouldn't I be? When Wagener or Sneap say that "you can't tell the difference" between the KPA and the real amp, I DO believe them. But think about what they are actually referring to. These are music engineering experts who have profiled the amps themselves. They have world-class skills and professional studios and gear to create AMAZING profiles. And MOST importantly, they're talking about the same guitarist AND guitar going through the amp and the profile.

Don't get me wrong - the Kemper is good. It can sound good recorded AND it can sound good amped with a solid state power amp and sent to a guitar cab (I got some nice results with that Blackstar profile). But as nice as the results were, they were still a compromise and fell short of what I was already achieving through my own rig.

Your own requirements may be different. Maybe your playing style is more similar to the guy who created the profile you try. The best I can say is to try one out yourself. Perhaps the KPA is the best evidence yet that "tone is in the hands." If the guy who makes the profile doesn't cover all the bases you'll need, there's not much you can do, but make the profiles yourself. Good luck with that... Other players may get better results than I did - it could well be that I missed something very important, but I did my best with it for a week, with the help of an experienced KPA user to guide me, but I still couldn't get it to sound as good as what I currently use, so it went back to the shop.

Overall Rating: 
3

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