Trevor Rabin era Yes appreciation

EugenicScumEugenicScum Posts: 5,323
edited August 2019 in Dino's Bar and Grill
I've recently been rediscovering the Trevor Rabin era Yes and I appreciate the song-driven approach of this era a lot more than I did back when I had first checked out the band. Rabin is a big part of this sound; he's to me a far better lead player than Howe was and his basic power chord-based rhythm work adds a nice bit of heaviness to an otherwise pop-oriented sound. I love the proggier Yes but every time there's a Howe electric guitar lead spot, I want to hit the skip button.

I also discovered this latest live release by the version of Yes featuring Rabin, Anderson and Wakeman and I liked it a lot.


Post edited by EugenicScum on
Check out my band: Bevar Sea

Comments

  • CyberattackCyberattack Posts: 93
    edited August 2019
    I'm with you on this. I know that "Owner of a Lonely Heart" can get a lot of hate for being a certain kind of kooky classic rock thing, but I completely love what Trevor Rabin did for the guitar solo on it. It's basically impossible for me to get sick of that song because of how much I love the guitar solo in it, totally wild and free. 
    Post edited by Cyberattack on
    My music videos and everything else: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCledLngWDeoZ0rzjIU6Pxzw
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,597
    edited August 2019
    I wouldn't say Rabin's a far better lead player than Howe, he's just a far more satisfying lead player because he plays a sexy, Dino style.  Howe is a badass, and a far better overall guitarist, with sick chops, but he plays that kind of 50's Chet Atkins style where he never really bends a string. 

    But yeah, Rabin is a beast. 
    Post edited by Dinosaur David B on
    When I was 16, I had three bumper stickers on the back of my Dodge Dart: The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, and The WHO.  Not much has changed. 
  • EugenicScumEugenicScum Posts: 5,323
    I do love Howe on the acoustic guitar though. 
    Check out my band: Bevar Sea
  • M11M11 Posts: 823
    Big fan here, I love 90125, Big Generator and the underrated Talk album from 1994. What I also like about the Rabin era Yes is that they had a strong second singer to share lead vocal duties with Jon Anderson.
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,366
    edited August 2019
    I really like the early prog era Yes...very cool songs and I love Jon Anderson. I think the earlier Yes was more bass and Keyboard driven and the guitar was more atmosphere. Chris Squire was an animal of a bass player and I have always told people if you want to dig the guitar playing of early Yes you listen to Squire. To me Howe's lead playing was about as interesting as tying my shoelaces. His acoustic work was good like Eugenic stated. Having said all this....I prefer the Rabin era Yes. Those first two albums Trevor was on were great and I love all the vocal harmonies and interplay with Anderson. I love the more song oriented approach.....but it was still very adventurous at times. I love songs like "It Can Happen", "Changes", "Hold On", "Leave It", "Shoot High Aim Low", "Big Generator", etc. 

    Rabin is a great guitarist, songwriter, arranger and singer. He really does not get enough credit outside the circle of musicians.
    Post edited by Duojett71 on
  • M11M11 Posts: 823


    Trevor in the studio explaining his tone and technique.
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,597
    edited August 2019
    He's been making a living doing soundtracks since the Yes years. 

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trevor_Rabin#Film_scores


    Post edited by Dinosaur David B on
    When I was 16, I had three bumper stickers on the back of my Dodge Dart: The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, and The WHO.  Not much has changed. 
  • OskyOsky Posts: 1,047
    I'm a big fan of the Rabin years, particularly 90125, Talk and even the more Rabin led tunes on Union. Never really bonded with Big Generator so much but it still has has its moments. Trevor's solo LP for 1989 Can't Look Away is also well worth a listen as it has much of the same sound minus Jon and Chris and the songs are top notch!


  • cvansicklecvansickle Posts: 6,159
    I quite enjoyed the Rabin era of Yes. 90125 and Big Generator had some killer cool songs, and Rabin was a smokin' hotshot who kept Yes relevant in the 80s.

    I saw Yes on the BG tour, twice in fact, on back to back nights. I was on a business trip to Charlotte, NC that week, and I had a ticket to see Yes in Atlanta at the end of that week. Turned out that Yes was playing Charlotte the night before, and I had nothing else to do, so I went to the show. Aside from the stupid old Popeye cartoons that served as the 'opening act' the show was absolutely brilliant and Rabin simply burned on guitar all night. The next evening I flew back to Atlanta, and I drove straight from the airport to catch the Atlanta show. I thought, if there was ever a concert I wanted to see again it was this one, and I actually had that opportunity! Both nights were stellar, with Charlotte's show having the slight edge in the energy department.
    Death Or Glory - Who Dares Wins!
  • EugenicScumEugenicScum Posts: 5,323
    M11 said:


    Trevor in the studio explaining his tone and technique.
    Wow, this was great. The interviewer was super knowledgeable and asked perfect questions.

    I actually haven't heard any of his solo or non-Yes albums. Intrigued!
    Check out my band: Bevar Sea
  • The SeekerThe Seeker Posts: 581
    This is Rabin's best known solo work from a great album.
    Spot the 'Comfortably Numb' based outro !!


  • Can't Look Away has been spinning here a lot and it's a great album, especially the first half. So much happens and everything is so full of hooks. I need to explore his other non Yes music.
    Check out my band: Bevar Sea
Sign In or Register to comment.