Bands where the guitarist/bassist/drummer are better singers than the singer.

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  • JasonJason Posts: 1,931
    Peter Baltes > Udo Dirkschneider
    I'd be interested in hearing Baltes on one of the rougher numbers because he seems to only take vocals on ballads. "Seawinds" sounds like it's straight off of a Scorpions album. Baltes sounds almost like Klaus.

    Having just read a Hoffmann interview with Metallian -- I apologize for indirectly comparing Accept to Scorpions.  :roll:
  • VandenbergVandenberg Posts: 3,897
    Coverdale, well David had one one of "the " finest rock voices of ALL time, Phil Lynott had one "the" finest rock voices of all time, boys I was there, done that, had a listen, and had the experience, you can debate it all you like, but jesus to suggest otherwise, your fucking idiots! Sorry lads but wrong on to many levels..................
  • VenomboyVenomboy Posts: 3,601
    I don't listen to most of the bands in this thread so I can't comment.

    However, if someone can stuff a sock in Mike Portnoy's mouth I would appreciate it
  • JasonJason Posts: 1,931
    [quote author=Vandenberg link=topic=8923.msg136444#msg136444 date=1251063439]
    Coverdale, well David had one one of "the " finest rock voices of ALL time, Phil Lynott had one "the" finest rock voices of all time, boys I was there, done that, had a listen, and had the experience, you can debate it all you like, but jesus to suggest otherwise, your fucking idiots! Sorry lads but wrong on to many levels..................
    [/quote]
    I think Phil's voice speaks to me loads more than other singers -- but when you think about it he didn't really have much range, power, control of dynamics etc.
    This brings into question the whole idea of theory vs. application. In theory, the Sebastian Bachs of the world would be more contructive to a song because they have more to work with -- however a lot of those 80s powermetal singers sound terribly generic to me -- they don't speak to me.

    What about Jimi Hendrix?
    [quote from alchemy profile] "It's hard to imagine anyone else singing those songs"
    Noel Redding was a pretty damn good pop singer on "She's So Fine".
    Phil's voice helped me thru bad times and his voice is the prime example of application > theory.
  • VandenbergVandenberg Posts: 3,897
    I have never really subscribed to the Theory  v application approach, there are a combined effort, not a "versus" as to me its all about making music and playing music, it doesn't matter what theory or techniques or range or style is used as long as the music is good, and to that end as you say Phils voice speaks to you in loads of ways, as it does to me to and so it is to all his fans,even after all these years,  it boils down to the music being the important thing imho, take Angus young, great player, but not the most technical, but when he stands infront of 50,000 people, they dont care because he is rocking and the music is rocking and most of the audience probably are musicians and just want the music, so I firmly uphold the belief that if you play what is requierd for the song, from the heart then everything else just all falls into place, and if that means at that point in a song it's an 8 finger tapping solo ala Jeff Watson, if its right and it fits and it is what is required then you pull it off easy, as its all about the music. As for Jimi, well there plenty been said about him! As for his voice, it worked.
  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    I think Phil knew his vocal range and simply remained within it to exploit the amount of emotion he could get to drip with.  Listen to his emotion in Don't Believe a Word or Renegade.  You feel like he is in the room telling you the story.  That and he could convey it live as well.  The man was an incredible singer partly because his voice was so unique and also because he kept a lot of that  folk flare to the songs.  He comes across as a first rate story teller and you get the emotional content too.  Sykes is good, he has a better range and I know Phil could not have sung a lot of the stuff Sykes did with Blue Murder, but to me they are two different singers.  Really not comparable form the perspective of being better than the lead singer in the bands they were in.  Now had you mentoned Tygers of Pan Tang, I would have agreed, but Jon Deverill and Sykes were very close in the vocal department.

    Sambora is a clear case of being better than the singer and I prefer Gilmour over Waters.  However, Waters had a uniqueness to his voice that initially made those songs.  Not so much the case anymore.

    Hendrix - Nuff said

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

  • Don't get me wrong when I said I prefer Sykes over Lynott. Phil was THE singer for Lizzy. I'm just saying if I had a band and I had to choose between a singer with a voice like Sykes and one like Lynott, I'd choose the one who could sing like Sykes.
  • I have to disagree about Sykes vs. Lynott, I think Lynott is more emotive and effective. Sykes to me sounds a little generic, and his lyrics are trash compared to Lynott's. Lynott, like Hendrix, proves that range is really not that important in being an effective singer, it's more attitude and emotion.

    And to add another band, John Frusciante is a better singer than Anthony Kiedis (Red Hot Chili Peppers). He has better control, range, tone, and vibrato. Plus, his lyrics on his solo albums are deeper than most Chili Peppers lyrics. Not to mention that live, I think Frusciante's voice is a lot more consistent, Kiedis flubs a fair few too many notes.
  • JasonJason Posts: 1,931
    Don't forget that backup vocalists aren't using their voices as rigorously as lead singers. It's easy to sing a melody line for a part and then just go back to whatever you were doing. In fact, this is the only useful thing I can do vocally. I could NEVER do lead vocals.
    Also: I think if you compare ANYONES lyrics to Phil Lynott's they will pale by comparison -- if you could even compare something like that.
  • [quote author=Jack V link=topic=8923.msg136605#msg136605 date=1251155134]
    Also: I think if you compare ANYONES lyrics to Phil Lynott's they will pale by comparison -- if you could even compare something like that.
    [/quote]

    I think there are lyricists that compare to Lynott: Bob Dylan, Hendrix, Roger Waters, Eddie Vedder, Joni Mitchell etc.
  • IsaacIsaac Posts: 3,088
    from a lyrical standpoint, waters and lynott are my faves.
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,485
    [quote author=CrazyW link=topic=8923.msg136315#msg136315 date=1250971562]
    [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=8923.msg136312#msg136312 date=1250970061]
    Jeff Pillson in Dokken.

    Anyone in Ratt, Electric Sun, the Plastic Ono band, 10000 Maniacs, Lou Reed's band.  :wink:
    [/quote]

    I wouldn't be so sure of Ratt, in the Whitesnake gigs with Demartini that I've watched, his backing vocals almost ruined the songs.
    [/quote]

    Juan Croucier sang most of the backing vocals in Ratt....and to my ears he had a pretty cool voice. To me Pilson sounded alot like Don Dokken. saw Dokken live in '96 or '97 and Pilson sang "Just Got Lucky" while Don played bass and it basically sounded the same....He also sounded eerily similar on the Lynch/Pilson album.

    I agree about Peter Baltes...I always liked when he sang a song or two on Accept albums....although I liked Udo....and he was a big part of Accept's identity.

    always like Adrian Smith's backing vocals live...although noone will make the arguement he was better than Bruce.

    I actually really dug Peter Criss's voice in Kiss and wish he had sung more.

    Loved Michael Anthony's backing vocals....but vocally he did not have the stamina to sing lead. Neither he or Hagar had the soul soulfulness of Roth. Nor did he or Roth have the range of Hagar.
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