Rock & Roll Lead Guitarists. Let's Say....1955 to 1962.

inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,653
There are plenty to choose from. Chuck Berry, Carl Perkins and Scotty Moore to Duane Eddy, Link Wray and James Burton. Which guitarists from this time period influenced you, influenced your guitar heros, or actually contributed specific techniques, tonality, or stage attitude that would play a role 10 years later in the creation of the Dino Rock stylings of Blackmore, Iommi, Clapton, Kossoff, Page, Beck, etc.

Think of me as a potato farmer. I'm looking for roots.

Rick
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Comments

  • None of them influenced me.  I remember reading that Cliff Gallup was Beck's hero.  Les Paul was pretty big with a lot of the dinos.  So was Hank Marvin.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • LerxstFanLerxstFan Posts: 4,729
    My earlier influences were mostly electric blues based guys. Freddie King, Muddy Waters and Abert King especially. I do have a soft spot for Chuck Berry though. Link Wray also is an exception. I dug a lot of George Harrisons early melodic ideas as well.
  • JoebuddhaJoebuddha Posts: 2,125
    Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly were big early influences on me.
    The solo to Johnny B. Goode and Rock Around The Clock by Bill Haley and the Comets were among the first solos I learned.
    In the mid-eighties right around the time that I started playing it was the era of Motown 25 and all these Rock and Roll revival shows were on T.V. all the time.
    So I videotaped a couple of them and I'd watch them over and over and try to pick up whatever licks or riffs that I could.
  • [quote author=Joebuddha link=topic=9500.msg145094#msg145094 date=1258942449]
    Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly were big early influences on me.
    The solo to Johnny B. Goode and Rock Around The Clock by Bill Haley and the Comets were among the first solos I learned.
    In the mid-eighties right around the time that I started playing it was the era of Motown 25 and all these Rock and Roll revival shows were on T.V. all the time.
    So I videotaped a couple of them and I'd watch them over and over and try to pick up whatever licks or riffs that I could.

    [/quote]

    Buddy Holly was actually an influence on John Lennon.  (Crickets.........  Beatles....see how that works?)  He was a big fan. I dig Buddy Holly. 

    The further back you go, it will always be about old blues guys for me. All of them. Chuck Berry works but I'm a big Muddy Waters fan although does he just slilghtly predate your time frame? And does James Brown make it in or does that ever so slightly post date your time frame? I'm not a musician but when I think about what influences the rock music that is so dear to me, I always think about the blues music that made it all possible. Led Zeppelin= Blues.  It's blatent. And it couldn't make me any happier.
  • Led Zeppelin= Blues.  It's blatent.
    Except where Led Zeppelin = folk rock, country, the Eastern and Indian flavors, celtic, reggae, and rockablilly.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • T-MANT-MAN Posts: 271
    None of the players from that era influenced me directly. Scotty Moore,however,was a big influence on Danny Gatton and Danny's approach to Travis-picking (which often employed Scotty Moore's patterns) influenced my hybrid-picking technique.

    Chuck Berry strikes me as the most influential among the guitarists that emerged in the 1960s that were mentioned. Link Wray is often mentioned by players associated with that era as well (Beck,Page,Hendrix,etc.) Wray's amped up blues-rock could be considered the prototype for later rock bands that used 12-bar blues format as a generic rock songwriting template.      

         

       
  • cvansicklecvansickle Posts: 6,221
    My first real influence was Jimmy Page, so whoever influenced him filtered down to me eventually.

    As I said in another thread, I discovered Carl Perkins in the early 90s. I was influenced by him at that time, as I was looking for things in other styles like blues, country and rockabilly music. Perkins had something that Scotty Moore, Eddie Cochran and others didn't have. Perkins made it swing, and I thought that was really cool. I also liked that Perkins' first band was made up of himself and his two brothers, so it was something real home-grown.
    Death Or Glory - Who Dares Wins!
  • JoebuddhaJoebuddha Posts: 2,125
    Chris,
    Than in the 80's and 90's Carl toured with his two sons as his backing band.
    I saw them twice and they were great.
  • [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=9500.msg145109#msg145109 date=1258948790]
    Led Zeppelin= Blues.  It's blatent.
    Except where Led Zeppelin = folk rock, country, the Eastern and Indian flavors, celtic, reggae, and rockablilly.
    [/quote]

    .......Shhhhhhhhh..................................

  • cvansicklecvansickle Posts: 6,221
    [quote author=Joebuddha link=topic=9500.msg145141#msg145141 date=1258982730]
    Chris,
    Than in the 80's and 90's Carl toured with his two sons as his backing band.
    I saw them twice and they were great.
    [/quote]
    Yeah Joe, I saw him with his sons at the Wildhorse Saloon in Nashville. It was the year before he died and it was one of the most energetic performances I've ever seen. And he had lost none of his chops in his age either.
    Death Or Glory - Who Dares Wins!
  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    Let's see:

    Buddy Holly, Carl Perkins, Scotty Moore and Chuck Berry would be the most influential in the time frame you are talking about.  Also need to add Buddy Guy and BB King though as well.

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

  • [quote author=maybeyes link=topic=9500.msg145148#msg145148 date=1258989342]
    Let's see:

    Buddy Holly, Carl Perkins, Scotty Moore and Chuck Berry would be the most influential in the time frame you are talking about.  Also need to add Buddy Guy and BB King though as well.
    [/quote]

    Good call. I left Buddy Guy out. He was fun to watch at the Pocono Blues Fest a few years back and that is definately appropriate for the time frame. BB King....sigh.... Love him and Lucille.
  • What about Lonnie Mack?? he has some cool instrumentals like Memphis and Wham, its all pretty primitive stuff but it sounds cool. SRV and Duane Allman were serious fans
  • [quote author=merlo_zeppelin link=topic=9500.msg145155#msg145155 date=1258998051]
    What about Lonnie Mack?? he has some cool instrumentals like Memphis and Wham, its all pretty primitive stuff but it sounds cool. SRV and Duane Allman were serious fans
    [/quote]

    Lonnie Mack can sure play!  His singing is awesome as well.

    I like all them old guys already mentioned plus Roy Buchanan, Buddy Guy, and the 'Three Kings".  Seeing Roy Clark and Gatemouth Brown on TV when I was a kid definitely got me turned on to guitar playing (even tho that performance is early 70's)

    Jimmy Bryant and Eldon Shamblin predate 55/62 a bit, but man those guys played some smoking hot stuff-on Fenders!

    Mickey Baker is another early guy who, although i'm only familiar with maybe two of his songs, he kills me every time.

    Most of these guys I got hip to after I started playing of course.  When I started out, it was pretty much all Ace Frehley and Tony Iommi.

  • The guy that had a lot of influence on the english players in this era was a guy called Bert Weedon.  Known as 'Mr Guitar'  he played for everyone from Nat King Cole, through Sinatra and Mantovani etc etc.

    He wrote a book called 'Play in a Day' which sold over 2 million copies

    Clapton, May, Hillage, Mile Oldfield, Bill Nelson, Pete Townshend. Beatles etc. are all quoted on his website as saying that his book was where they all started

    His website is fascinating

    http://www.bertweedon.com/index.shtml


         

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