What truly frightens me...

[Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0
I was just thinking, being a young dino has its disadvantages. I was watching some recent performances from artists I love and some of these guys are getting pretty old. It's only a matter of time before guys/artists like Lynch, Heaven & Hell, Hughes, JLT, Coverdale, Schenker, Priest, EVH, etc.. decide to retire. Others like Page, Beck, Jake E Lee seem to have no intentions in recording new material. Then there are also a few whose recent music I simply am not interested in (Blackmore, Moore) and a few whose output for the last decade is just not of the same quality as their old stuff (Slash, Night Ranger).

There aren't too many new dino bands I really like and there's even fewer young guitar heros out there, actually some of the guys I've discovered on more recent albums are simply old players who've been around for a while but never achieved any fame when still young (Doug Aldrich, Jimi Bell). I have to face it, within maybe 15 years I will have little new records to look forward to, and the thought of that scares me.
Post edited by ingve on
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Comments

  • FenceFence Posts: 282
    I believe the future is you. That is, a mini fan base of 50 people that really get your music. Don't tag along with trends. Music is your passion alone. This depicts some sort of fear of starting anything by yourself. I'm scared too that the world would lack good music. So use it as a motivation to get started. So one day your bio would say:
    It all started with a sobbing kid on a retro forum . . .  :biggrin: ...
  • IsaacIsaac Posts: 3,088
    crazyw, i was lamenting over the exact same thing. i'm underage, so i can't see shows in bars, and all my dino faves play in age restricted areas. i'm quite afraid that i will never be able to see some of my fave dino bands because by the time i'm 18, the bands might no even be touring anymore. least not in canada. geeze, nobody comes to canada... :weep:
  • ingveingve Posts: 1,616
    Fuck, I didn't realise this was a retro forum!! Does that make me "old"?

    Even if people do "retire", or the ranks just thin out through natural attrition, it doesn't mean that the music will die or become diminished. At least nowadays people are putting some effort into making DVDs, so lots of performances will survive in some form for those unfortunate enough to have been unable to see them in person.

    How many people saw Hendrix or Randy? Not nearly as many as are still inspired and uplifted by them.

    I have literally thousands of hours of music on CD, DVD, MP3. And there's still more out there, both from the past and still being made. Every now and then I discover some band that blows my mind. The past couple of years have given me The Answer, Bugdust, Blindstone, Jon Oliva's Pain, Electric Mary.... I'd say things are alive and well.
  • pprovostpprovost Posts: 2,638
    What depresses me even more is that, in the next 10-15 years, we will start to see some of the guys like Clapton, Beck, Iommi, and Page becoming a topic in the obituary section. The older guys are in their mid-60s now. It's just a matter of time.
    I think sometimes if you try to play too technically, you lose something in the music - like you're playing for another guitar player. I like to play for people. The more sophisticated and mature guitarists become, the more they go with the feel.

    - Ritchie Blackmore


  • JasonJason Posts: 1,931
    I share your thoughts CrazyW. That's why I play guitar every day, and stick to my guns when it comes to songwriting.
    Hopefully my persistence will pay off.
  • [quote author=CrazyW link=topic=9084.msg138751#msg138751 date=1252961914]
    I was just thinking, being a young dino has its disadvantages. I was watching some recent performances from artists I love and some of these guys are getting pretty old. It's only a matter of time before guys/artists like Lynch, Heaven & Hell, Hughes, JLT, Coverdale, Schenker, Priest, EVH, etc.. decide to retire. Others like Page, Beck, Jake E Lee seem to have no intentions in recording new material. Then there are also a few whose recent music I simply am not interested in (Blackmore, Moore) and a few whose output for the last decade is just not of the same quality as their old stuff (Slash, Night Ranger).

    There aren't too many new dino bands I really like and there's even fewer young guitar heros out there, actually some of the guys I've discovered on more recent albums are simply old players who've been around for a while but never achieved any fame when still young (Doug Aldrich, Jimi Bell). I have to face it, within maybe 15 years I will have little new records to look forward to, and the thought of that scares me.
    [/quote]

    If Slash dies I may have a total melt down.  With out that guy no way am I ever here...
  • SanchoSancho Posts: 18,678
    What scares me most is that Lady Gaga plays for a sold out Sportpaleis (capacity 12.000) and Mr big were playing to about 400 fans...

    But I see your point. The old guys are getting just that, old. Won't be around for ever.
    There are new Dino bands, but it's impossible to get a break. Melodic rock is dead in the water (see first paragraph) and is downsized to the point of being the current underground.
    House Of Lords will play the same bar in Antwerp we played with Monster Joe. There will probably be ample sitting room :sad2:
    It's impossible to get a start with a new band when you're competing with the likes of JLT and Riot for a record deal with a minor German label that originated from a mailorder...
  • [quote author=pprovost link=topic=9084.msg138768#msg138768 date=1252977190]
    What depresses me even more is that, in the next 10-15 years, we will start to see some of the guys like Clapton, Beck, Iommi, and Page becoming a topic in the obituary section. The older guys are in their mid-60s now. It's just a matter of time.
    [/quote]

    Yes, THAT is depressing.  Lemmy, Blackmore, Iommi, Dio, Page...  All the heroes of my youth... at that time, I didn't realize they were about the same age as my parents.  But as you get older, you become more and more conscious of time fleeing faster and faster...

    As far as music is concerned, I'm with Ingve: it will remain, and there are still tons of old material to discover. The thrill of hearing new stuff also exists, provided you take the time to listen and open your mind to contemporary heavy rock: obviously, there's a lot of garbage, but not only garbage, and it's up to you to find the few ones that will "ring your bell", maybe bands that will be regarded as "Y2K dinos" in 2030 or 2040...  Some prog metal, stoner or death metal ones definitely have classic metal ingredients in their music, and can be considered as true continuators, not imitators, of the past.

  • yngwie666yngwie666 Posts: 6,557
    [quote author=Sancho link=topic=9084.msg138802#msg138802 date=1253007844]
    What scares me most is that Lady Gaga plays for a sold out Sportpaleis (capacity 12.000) and Mr big were playing to about 400 fans...
    [/quote]
    Yes but this have been the case for boys bands in the 90's that are now out of fashion. In the other hands you see bands like AC/DC or Led Zep reunion attracting a lot of crowd. The problem is I don't see a "new" band doing the same.
  • I think Dino music is giong the way jazz is going. More or less well-rounded musicians who play for a very specific audience, with only the absolute top being able to earn more than a nice sum of money.

    The rest will have to keep playing small bars and the occasional big festival.
  • [quote author=Sancho link=topic=9084.msg138802#msg138802 date=1253007844]
    There are new Dino bands, but it's impossible to get a break. Melodic rock is dead in the water (see first paragraph) and is downsized to the point of being the current underground.
    House Of Lords will play the same bar in Antwerp we played with Monster Joe. There will probably be ample sitting room :sad2:
    [/quote]

    At least I'll be in the front row then.  :biggrin2:

    But I agree the only melodic rock bands who can still sell a decent amount by today's standards are the ones on Frontiers, who seem to do a great job at marketing that stuff. I think there will still be a fair amount of 70s hard rock inspired artists in a few decades but I can't see many new glam metal/aor artists by then. There will be bands but they'll be so obscure I simply won't know of their existence. The genre seems to get slammed and ridiculed by the critics while grunge and alt rock are praised. Stuff like Smoke on the Water, Paranoid and Boys are Back in Town will be regarded as classics and still played on retro radio stations. I somehow doubt they'll ever play Here I Go Again or Dr Feelgood by then though.
  • pprovostpprovost Posts: 2,638
    What boggles the mind is that you have all these Classic Rock stations in virtually every city and larger towns. They all generally have significant listening audiences. In almost every YouTube video featuring a band from the 70s or 80s, there are repeated comments by young people, over and over again, that they wish that they made music today like those bands did. That the classic rock bands had people that could really write and play their instruments. Yet, the record companies turn a blind eye and fail to recognize the demand and sign bands that play 70s and 80s style music.
    I think sometimes if you try to play too technically, you lose something in the music - like you're playing for another guitar player. I like to play for people. The more sophisticated and mature guitarists become, the more they go with the feel.

    - Ritchie Blackmore


  • LegacyLegacy Posts: 878
    It all goes around imo, it's already slightly better than it was a couple of years ago.
  • I really think that pure Dino music is on the way out. BUT, there will still be bands that have Dino influences.

    Look at John Mayer for example, he's not a Dino, but he's definitely influenced by the style, and you can hear it in his guitar playing. I think that's how Dino music will continue on, it will be mixed and combined with other styles.

    Rage Against the Machine is another example, Dino Riff Rock with Rap influences. The Dino is still there, but there're more colors thrown in, and that's what makes the music have a diverse audience.
  • [quote author=Legacy link=topic=9084.msg138827#msg138827 date=1253033312]
    It all goes around imo, it's already slightly better than it was a couple of years ago.
    [/quote]

    Probably.  And you know, the reign of turd didn't begin with the 90s.  Bands like Adam and the Ants :puking: Orchestral Manoeuvres in The Dark  :puking: Duran Duran :puking: Soft Cell :puking: Dexys Midnight Runners  :puking: Culture Club :puking:  and all that stinky rhinoceros shit, were BIG during the early 80s.






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