What Makes a Great Guitar?

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Comments

  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 2,396
    Different guitars will be great in different ways, and some don't stay great as your audio and visual preferences change over time. In the 80s, I thought Kramer, Ibanez, and Jackson guitars were great. In the 90s, I wanted to add Fenders to my stable. Last two years, I have been impressed by Reverends.

    I once read in a guitar magazine that many musicians hear with their eyes. I believe I am guilty.

    No matter what I try, I ALWAYS come back to a Les Paul though. It's the sound, the feel, the balance, AND the looks that works for me.
    There's a lot if truth to this. In the 90's I was dead set on Rhoads or Kelly models from Jackson. I don't even look at those these days. 
  • merlo_zeppelinmerlo_zeppelin Posts: 1,476
    Great topic!
    I would say that for me. a great guitar is about confort and playability, I find that the sound part you cand make up with electronics.
    But yeah, having a lightweight, balanced guitar that doesn't head dive is a must, getting the action reasonably low without excessive buzzing or killing the resonance, having the PERFECT amount of tension in the strings, that is really important, if it's too hard you can barely fret let alone bend, but if the strings are too soft I find there´s not enough resistence in the string and it feels like walking in mud  (and when you try to play fast it feels like RUNNING in mud).

    I'm not super finicky about necks, as long as they´re not ridiculously wide or thin or thick or narrow, I'm ok.

    I started out on a Les Paul copy and still feel most confortable with that, but a couple years ago I bought an Ibanez super strat that has really grown on me.
  • I once read in a guitar magazine that many musicians hear with their eyes.
    Gibson's whole sales model has always leaned on that premise.
    I threw me guitar out. Why bother? Why bother? Use it as a coffee table. Because I can't play it like that. 
    -- David St. Hubbins.
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 2,396
    Great topic!
    I would say that for me. a great guitar is about confort and playability, I find that the sound part you cand make up with electronics.
    But yeah, having a lightweight, balanced guitar that doesn't head dive is a must, getting the action reasonably low without excessive buzzing or killing the resonance, having the PERFECT amount of tension in the strings, that is really important, if it's too hard you can barely fret let alone bend, but if the strings are too soft I find there´s not enough resistence in the string and it feels like walking in mud  (and when you try to play fast it feels like RUNNING in mud).

    I remember years ago when Glenn Tipton made a video showing around his gear, and he demonstrated how perfectly balanced his Hamer signature model was. The pointy one. He put it on, released his hands from it, and t stayed dead set on the same position. He made a big deal out if it, and of course, he was right. 
  • mr_crowleymr_crowley Posts: 6,662
    the PERFECT amount of tension in the strings, that is really important, if it's too hard you can barely fret let alone bend, but if the strings are too soft I find there´s not enough resistence in the string and it feels like walking in mud  (and when you try to play fast it feels like RUNNING in mud).


    ^ This a thousand times over. I've discovered the last few years how very important it is. It is not a dead set point either but depends in which shape my playing is. If I am at a point where I've played a lot and really getting into my best playing I can add more tension and in response playing even faster and more aggressive yet being clean. Being a bit "out of shape" or rusty playing wise, like I am now (it sucks by the way but life tends to happen), I need less tension to be able to pull off at least an acceptable performance. The better I am the more tension I can deal with and I feel that it accelerate how good my playing is. A revelation I had just like three years ago. Something that is talked very little about, at least in my experience.

    Other than that. I don't even consider a guitar if it doesn't look good to me. After that it needs to bring something to table tone wise that I just don't have in my arsenal. I don't need two guitars that sounds the same. So that is important.
    Comfortable neck is important, but I am not picky though I prefer thin and wide ones. Though my favourite ever was on my RW Strat, which I don't own anymore. Loved that neck hated how the guitar sounded though :lol: 
    I like it to have some weight, those feather light ones aren't for me. I want to have something substantial slung around my neck. It's also elementary it keeps in tune but my experience is that most decent guitars do that pretty well. 


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