What Squier Would A Fender Master Builder Buy?

This is a pretty interesting exercise once they get into it.  Surprising quality on these cheaper guitars.


I threw me guitar out. Why bother? Why bother? Use it as a coffee table. Because I can't play it like that. 
-- David St. Hubbins.

Comments

  • MelodicGritMelodicGrit Posts: 669
    I could be wrong, but wasn't Trower playing Squires for awhile during the 80s?  
  • StitselStitsel Posts: 2,190
    He was.... I believe those older MIJ models were actually pretty high quality....just made in Japan! I had a MIJ '72 re-issue cream colored Strat, that was just beautiful.....not a Squire, but did say MIJ in tiny letters on the back of the headstock.....looked identical to Yngwie's classic Strat.....& just a beautiful solid guitar.....I traded it it & another MIJ Strat I had for a real 1975 Strat.... but I remember that MIJ one was killer.
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 2,310
    edited January 3
    Yeah, A Squier from the 80’s is not the same thing as one from the 90’s onward. Totally different quality, as far as I can tell.
    Post edited by Tatosh Guitar on
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 18,266
    Didn't they start out as two different companies like Gibson and Epiphone.
    I threw me guitar out. Why bother? Why bother? Use it as a coffee table. Because I can't play it like that. 
    -- David St. Hubbins.
  • MelodicGritMelodicGrit Posts: 669
    Yeah, A Squier from the 80’s is not the sane things as one from the 90’s onward. Totally different quality, as far as I can tell.
    That's interesting.  Just curious, what's the difference?  I know next-to-nothing about the Squire brand.  
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 2,310
    edited January 3
    Didn't they start out as two different companies like Gibson and Epiphone.
    Yes, they did. The original brand is older than Fender.

    That's interesting.  Just curious, what's the difference?  I know next-to-nothing about the Squire brand.  
    Quality. The first ones were made in Japan, and we know they can make great stuff there. Over time they moved the production to Korea and China, among other places, and the quality went down. I have played new models and they are pure crap, IMHO.
    Post edited by Tatosh Guitar on
  • SnoogansSnoogans Posts: 1,708
    Quality. The first ones were made in Japan, and we know they can make great stuff there. Over time they moved the production to Korea and China, among other places, and the quality went down. I have played new models and they are pure crap, IMHO.
    I have a '83 Japanese Squier Strat. It's the best Strat that I've ever owned!
    Official DRG threadkiller
  • Yeah, A Squier from the 80’s is not the sane things as one from the 90’s onward. Totally different quality, as far as I can tell.
    That's interesting.  Just curious, what's the difference?  I know next-to-nothing about the Squire brand.  
    2000 the build quality improved a great deal.  That year also left the plywood body behind.  Tuners prior to 2000 were those with covers on the back and were just awful.  This is a 20th anniversary model from 2002, with an alder body and maple neck a fantastic guitar.     

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  • Here's a 2001, double fat telecaster deluxe with a mahogany body and set neck with split coil switching made in Korea.  These were $499 in 2001.  A lot cheaper in 2016, when you reference it as just another Squier. 

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  • dinomikesr1963dinomikesr1963 Posts: 531
    edited January 21
    You can always listen to Jack Pearson as to what he thinks about his Squier guitars.  His $87 guitar that you can see him using with a number of great bands.     There are two mods you need to do with Squier strats.  That's add a wire so the bridge pickup has use of a tone pot.    The other is add a on/off switch so you can play the neck and bridge pickup together.  That's it. 


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EW_ajThs8Vo&t=4s
    Post edited by dinomikesr1963 on
    "These riffs were built to last a lifetime." Keith Richards B)

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  • StitselStitsel Posts: 2,190
    That's a badass looking Tele. I'm finding myself more & more attracted to the Tele body shape as of late.....is something wrong....am I getting old? Wtf

  • Stitsel said:
    That's a badass looking Tele. I'm finding myself more & more attracted to the Tele body shape as of late.....is something wrong....am I getting old? Wtf
    Are you referring to the blue tele I posted?  If so, that also has a carved top so it's a unique shape in the tele realm as well.  If you're a LP person, that may have caught your eye.  I thought it was great myself.  
    "These riffs were built to last a lifetime." Keith Richards B)

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  • Let's look at one of those awful plywood body Squiers from back in the day. My research said this is/was a Squier Contemporary Stratocaster II made by Fender. This was the first series made in Korea.  Well Ok then.  It is a Squier II, from 1989.  It's one that you would see things written about like "the Squier II, it's got a quality maple neck".  I have to say I didn't see anything special about the neck other than maybe the gloss finish and not necessarily about how it played.  The neck pictured isn't a Squier II neck.  I used the other neck I got in the deal.  It's a Allparts neck.  Back story: I wanted a Squier II Strat to try but the so called neck adds to price more than I was willing to pay for a guitar with a suspect plywood body.  I found the one pictured on a local Facebook market place for $50 so I went and looked at it.  I got there and it was a guitar with many issues.  In fact he had that guitar, a mini guitar, and another Affinity for sale and after looking at them all I expressed that none were playable and all were in need of repair.  My offer, I'll take all three guitars and that Allparts neck for $40.  Sold.  

    The Squier II was black and I removed over 3 pounds of paint, primer, and bondo.
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    I found a crack in the plys.  I spread it open and took a syringe filled with Gorilla wood glue and injected it then clamped it together to dry.  
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    The outer edge of the guitar all the way around were not uniform.  At all.  I had to reshape it all with a fine file rasp and sand paper on a block, including the belly cut, to remove many hills and valleys that were filled with bondo from the factory. 
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    The light spot is the completed crack repair.
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    The neck had a stripped mounting hole.  Choices.  Instead of drilling it out and adding a dowel I chose instead to drill out all 4 hole removing all the previous woodscrew threads.  I then purchased larger wood metal screws with deeper threads and drilled the holes to size.  The mounted neck is attached and tightened with all the strength I could muster.  I couldn't make any of them strip again.  The anniversary plate was on the Affinity I got with it.    
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    It didn't have a trim cover so I made two wooden covers from a piece of scrap flooring ply I had.  The finish?  Left over mahogany I had to refinishing a desk and clear polyurethane put on with sponge.    
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    It started at 7.8 pounds.  As it sits here it weighs 4 pounds.  GFS vintage plate mounted tuners, Tusq precut nut, .38 Special casings pot hole plugs, Affinity bridge, block, and saddles, Squier II humbucker wired straight to a 500k volume pot.  The sustain is surprising and it's loud.  By loud I mean that after playing any other HB guitar this one has a lot more noticeable volume when plugging into and playing through the previous guitar's rig set up.  Not brittle sounding at all.  Not muddy, yet thick, and to quote Ted Nugent from Double Live Gonzo, "this guitar simply refuses to play sweet shit, it just refuses".  It won't "blow the balls off a charging rhino at 60 paces" like a Byrdland, but I'm good at 40 paces.  Sounds great on raunchy versions of Rocky Mountain Way, Mississippi Queen, Cat Scratch Fever, Strangle Hold, and Black Betty. I had a lot of fun putting it together.    
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    "These riffs were built to last a lifetime." Keith Richards B)

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    Member:
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