Single pickup guitars

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  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 8,005
    edited August 2020
    Duojett71 said:
    Honestly I never had a real problem with the guitar tones on the first two Dio albums either. I think the lead tone is fine...as I do the rhythm tone. I think maybe the mix of the albums could have been a little better but, really it does not take anything away from them. When I think of bad guitar tones on 80's .albums....those Dio albums do not come to mind.
    Well it's not "a problem," and I certainly don't want to ruin it for anyone (not that I could). But if you were to compare just the guitar TONES on those two albums with other metal albums of 83 and 84:

    83
    Victims of the Future
    Piece of Mind
    Balls to the Wall
    Mean Streak
    No Parole from Rock n Roll
    Thunder and Lightning
    Bark at the Moon
    Shout at the Devil
    Born Again
    even Pyromania

    84
    Perfect Strangers
    Love at First Sting
    Out of the Cellar
    Powerslave
    The Warning
    Tooth and Nail
    Defenders of the Faith
    In Rock We Trust
    We Want Moore
    Nights of the New Thunder
    Slide it In

    I think you might find that the VC Dio TONES are thinner, and lack some warmth and body.  Doesn't mean the albums aren't great. They are.


    And yes, kiddies. At one time, it was common to have this many good releases in one year. But then, 83/84 was arguably the peak years for melodic Metal.
    There are some stunning examples there. Wolf was incredible on BTTW, Sykes...Tony's runs on BA had that ridiculously-distorted-but-fits-perfect thing going. And of course, Perfect Strangers had some of Blackmore's best tone and playing. Nuts about Glenn and KK on Defenders, too.

    Malmsteen had that Uli Roth-Scorps on steroids sound that was pretty great, too.

    Hard to argue.

    Yeah, I think 84 was the last peak for me as far as tons of great Dino albums. After that I started turning more toward Extreme Metal, too much of it was getting commercial, fast. But that's just me (there were plenty of great Dino releases before the end of the decade).

    Post edited by Haffner on
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 3,807
    Duojett71 said:
    Honestly I never had a real problem with the guitar tones on the first two Dio albums either. I think the lead tone is fine...as I do the rhythm tone. I think maybe the mix of the albums could have been a little better but, really it does not take anything away from them. When I think of bad guitar tones on 80's .albums....those Dio albums do not come to mind.
    Well it's not "a problem," and I certainly don't want to ruin it for anyone (not that I could). But if you were to compare just the guitar TONES on those two albums with other metal albums of 83 and 84:

    83
    Victims of the Future
    Piece of Mind
    Balls to the Wall
    Mean Streak
    No Parole from Rock n Roll
    Thunder and Lightning
    Bark at the Moon
    Shout at the Devil
    Born Again
    even Pyromania

    84
    Perfect Strangers
    Love at First Sting
    Out of the Cellar
    Powerslave
    The Warning
    Tooth and Nail
    Defenders of the Faith
    In Rock We Trust
    We Want Moore
    Nights of the New Thunder
    Slide it In

    I think you might find that the VC Dio TONES are thinner, and lack some warmth and body.  Doesn't mean the albums aren't great. They are.


    And yes, kiddies. At one time, it was common to have this many good releases in one year. But then, 83/84 was arguably the peak years for melodic Metal.
    Old good Times, When you had hard to choose the albums where invest you tinny money. 
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 2,323
    There's not a single bad album on that list, and they all feature outstanding guitar tone. Man, those were the days...
  • SnoogansSnoogans Posts: 1,711
    edited August 2020
    I remember a discussion somewhere about single-pickup guitars sounding better because there's no magnetic pull from the other pickups affecting the string vibrations.
    I don't know about that, but I do know that single-pickup guitars look cooler. They just do!


    (....says the guy whose avatar picture mostly features the neck pickup of his guitar :s)
    Post edited by Snoogans on
    Official DRG threadkiller
  • Snoogans said:
    I remember a discussion somewhere about single-pickup guitars sounding better because there's no magnetic pull from the other pickups affecting the string vibrations. 

    Meh. I don't believe that. The only way the pup's magnetic pull affects the string vibration is if it's too high/close to the strings. And when it's set that way, it's obvious because everything sounds wrong. As soon as you lower it to where it's not a problem, it's not a problem.  That is, if the neck pup is not affecting the string vibration over the neck pickup, it won't be affecting it over the bridge pickup either.
    I threw me guitar out. Why bother? Why bother? Use it as a coffee table. Because I can't play it like that. 
    -- David St. Hubbins.
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 2,323
    Cork sniffers will say everything. I have heard guys say that the extra wiring affects how one pickup reacts to the other, that the pickup battery on actives changes tone (instead of, you know, the fact that you have active pickups instead of passives, duh!). I have even seen guys discuss the difference in tone screws make, ffs!

    the fact is, one vs. two PUs is an easy one to disprove. There are literaly thousands of guitars of both styles out there loaded with say, a Duncan JB. A guy like Warren had one of each as his signature models and he never sounded that differently when he traded, aside of the fact that he didn’t have a neck PU for certain songs.
  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,704
    Even the pro's screw up. I read an article where Brad Paisley was talking about why he loved one pickup Esquires over Telecasters for bridge tones. He said the added solid body wood where the neck pickup cavity would normally be added to the bridge pickup's tonal quality.

    Years later I read an article on Fenders own website where they said that other than the first two years of production all one pickup Esquires actually have a neck pickup cavity. The production costs for Fender were kept down by making all of their single cut bodies identical in build and design. The Esquire pick guard covered the neck cavity.
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 3,807
    Allan Holldsworth used to claim that swimming pool routing on his Charvel was contributing to better tone because it did some kind of semyhollowhis flavour. 

    Others prefer full mass bodies. 

    There's people favoring blocked trems on strats for better sustain. Other people claim no better than tom bridges. 

    So...just grab the guitar, trust your ears. 
  • I don't think the difference between the old rout and the swimming pool makes any significant TONAL difference. You're talking about an ounce or two of wood weight (which is not much), and that body wood is not a dominant tone factor like bridge saddles and bridge/tremblock mass. All things being equal, I prefer lighter-bodied guitars. As for blocking the trem, it probably does do a little something for sustain because in connects the trem block (indirectly) to the the body instead of it just hanging free. But I'd also guess it's of marginal tonal benefit over a non-blocked trem with a vintage or aftermarket high-mass trem block.
    I threw me guitar out. Why bother? Why bother? Use it as a coffee table. Because I can't play it like that. 
    -- David St. Hubbins.
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