ALD?

I can't find it? 
I was explaining it to a long time student today and he thought it was a hilarious and amazing concept but I cannot find it.
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  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 1,693
    Its been gone for years. Don`t know why.

    I actually wanted the pictures. LOL
  • Yeah, I took it down years ago. It got to the point whenever I went back and read it, I cringed. It wasn't aging well, or gracefully.  


    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,587
    I'm getting old. Please remind me what we're talking about.
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,480
    edited February 1
    inmyhands said:
    I'm getting old. Please remind me what we're talking about.

    We're talking about the Alex Lifeson's Disease concept article I wrote in the earliest days of DRG, where I called Alex Lifeson a pussy for ceasing to play guitar-hero style guitar solos in Rush songs and likened it to a disease afflicting DRG guitarists at that time. And it certainly WAS true at that time. But I was pissed-off and vitriolic when I wrote it. And when I, in the 2000s, saw video clips of Lifeson on tour with plastic dinosaurs on top of his amps, I started thinking, oh shit! Is that a coincidence? It's not unreasonable to think someone showed him that article. I started to wonder to myself: why am I calling this guy I respect TREMENDOUSLY, a pussy? Yeah, I would have preferred he'd never changed his pre-Signals approach to guitar solos. But what I felt about it in 1999 was not what I felt about it in 2009 and later. And now, I'm thinking if I ever had the chance to meet him -- one of my heroes, he'd say, "Oh, you're the guy who called me a pussy."  And beyond that, guitar solos, in fact, DID come back to a degree -- maybe not quite as indulgent as in the 80s, but on an acceptable-to-me level.  And then bands like Y&T, Accept, that had been on hiatus during the terrible 90s period actually came back. And when Viv Campbell started playing Dio songs and solos again . . .  that article I wrote didn't seem so clever anymore (to me).  

    ALD  is a useful reference here, but it doesn't need that article to make that point anymore.


    Post edited by Dinosaur David B on
    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,797
    edited February 2
    inmyhands said:
    I'm getting old. Please remind me what we're talking about.

    We're talking about the Alex Lifeson's Disease concept article I wrote in the earliest days of DRG, where I called Alex Lifeson a pussy for ceasing to play guitar-hero style guitar solos in Rush songs and likened it to a disease afflicting DRG guitarists at that time. And it certainly WAS true at that time. But I was pissed-off and vitriolic when I wrote it. And when I, in the 2000s, saw video clips of Lifeson on tour with plastic dinosaurs on top of his amps, I started thinking, oh shit! Is that a coincidence? It's not unreasonable to think someone showed him that article. I started to wonder to myself: why am I calling this guy I respect TREMENDOUSLY, a pussy? Yeah, I would have preferred he'd never changed his pre-Signals approach to guitar solos. But what I felt about it in 1999 was not what I felt about it in 2009 and later. And now, I'm thinking if I ever had the chance to meet him -- one of my heroes, he'd say, "Oh, you're the guy who called me a pussy."  And beyond that, guitar solos, in fact, DID come back to a degree -- maybe not quite as indulgent as in the 80s, but on an acceptable-to-me level.  And then bands like Y&T, Accept, that had been on hiatus during the terrible 90s period actually came back. And when Viv Campbell started playing Dio songs and solos again . . .  that article I wrote didn't seem so clever anymore (to me).  

    ALD  is a useful reference here, but it doesn't need that article to make that point anymore.


    Feelings of betrayal...that's what I got from that ALD article. I wasn't big on Lifeson besides his old school ripping on Working Man (perhaps my favorite song by the band) and the out-there risk taking on Tom Sawyer. So his leaving behind of Dino-isms didn't really provoke much response in me, I never cared that much for his playing anyway (yes, I know he's quite great, folks).

    I did however feel pretty bad about Gary going and staying Blues (I think it was either Amy or Dave who wrote "like the world really needed another one of those!" lol). I mean, Gary still featured some ripping playing during his last era, but the studio (and for the majority live) output just seem ill-advised...at least to a person like me, who borderline worshipped Black Rose and We Want Moore.

    Vivian Campbell provoked (and still provokes) somewhat similar feelings. I haven't liked him on pretty much anything since Dio, felt that his whole sound and style changed. I actually liked a couple of Riverdogs tracks...but the leads didn't sound like the Vivian I was pretty darn crazy about in 1983-1986, and his movement to full blown  hair metal did zero for a person whom at the time was getting into bands like Bathory, Death, Morbid Angel, Slayer, Testament, and Sodom more than anything Dino. Hated that he supposedly "replaced" Sykes and then Steve Clark, too. Stopped caring with the Lep, and have stayed in that gear to this very day (also wasn't thrilled with his cash-grab-after-the-fact Dio resurrection, especially considering how "vile" he saw the elfin vocal master only a couple of years before his death and completely trashed the catalogue of music he did with him...grrrrr).

    Jake E. Lee, John Sykes...two more guys who were huge for me when I started playing, then kind of fizzled out (though for different reasons other than seeming lack of inspiration or "progression" into a different genre.

    So, I can see where Dave took ALD down...but the sentiment resounds with me.

    Of course, I'm no one to talk. I am nowhere near the same universe as those players, but I went five years putting guitar aside completely. I had reason for it (studying other forms of music). But still...
    Post edited by Haffner on
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,700
    These days, I try to avoid being too mean to ageing rock musicians unless they behave like pathetic assholes, which Lifeson never did AFAIK...  these guys are dropping like flies, and it would make feel bad to make snarky comments about them, wake up the next morning and find out they're dead... 

    As an example, Hawkwind leader Dave Brock and original member Nik Turner will respectively turn 79 and 80 years old this year. They can't reconcile. Dave still fronts Hawkwind and plays live. Nik has a solo career, but the old rascal still angers Dave as he's too often tempted to peddle his solo act as "Nik Turner's Hawkwind". Both of them release new albums almost on a yearly basis. Would you check out these new releases (I always do), you'd find it easy to take cheap shots...  But these old geezers are still there, like a time bubble from 1971, playing loud space-rock on stage, so I'm just thankful for that. 
  • FWIW, we are not still in the musical world that existed in 1999 when I wrote that article. 

    Alex Lifeson alone, went back to playing more somewhat traditional solos. But I will NEVER say that on the last half dozen Rush albums (which do nothing for me), that he was playing his solos with his Pre-Signals guitarist brain.

    Nor is Michael Schenker (who also, has lost NO ability and plays his memorable solos, perfectly, live), is NOT playing his recent guitar solos with his 80s brain. He now spits out, and records whatever crap comes to him in the spur of the moment, rather than working on, and composing the kind of BRILLIANT solos he came up with between 1974-1984.  Fuck his current approach. Even sober, he's a moron on this point.

    Gary. Fuck Gary's WHOLE blues career and his disavowing everything that came before it.  For ME, Gary died in 1990, not 2011. Loved the guy before 1990. Disgusted with the guy after 1990. Whatever that was, it was far worse than ALD.

    Campbell. You could NOT have buried the hatched with RJD before he died, you little twat? When Dio was touring with Goldie, Sarzo and Simon Wright and calling that lame-ass band, DIO. You waited till after he died to get the balls to start playing those songs and solos again? Fuck Viv Campbell doing the band Last in Line -- especially after Ronnie died. 

    Right or wrong, people make their choices.

    DRG has been around for 20 years now. Rock and metal was in a TERRIBLE place when I started DRG.  Some of those old feelings from that time still run strong and still apply. Some do not. 

    As we have stopped growing as a site, and everyone still here has been here a LONNNNNG time, there's an innate understanding among those of us still here as to what is fair game and what is not.

    In 1999 there was a legit fear that guitar solos were going the way of the Dinosaur. To folks like us, that was a horrifying thought.  And solos dipped, and declined, and it teetered on the edge of extinction. But eventually, they came back.  NOT as strong as ever, but strong enough to believe they probably won't go away again. 

    To my way of thinking, a composed guitar solo is every bit a legitimate part of a song composition as strong verses and hooky choruses.  But that is MY opinion. 

    LOSINGS ONE'S BALLS is the one thing I don't see any reason for, and cannot condone, among players who once stood tall in this regard. To go from Cream to Skim Milk. I'll never get it.

    If you ever hear that coming from MY musical output, please cut off my hands and sell off all my gear. If I cannot play with BALLS and DINO attitude, I should not and will not play guitar.


    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • Andy GAndy G Posts: 996
    edited February 3
    I've often thought that the loss of fire and enthusiasm amongst folks like Gary and Vivian was something psychological. They both built their careers playing the speed card - Gary especially. But if you play the fastest gun, somebody is always going to be faster. When faster players came along, it's almost as if they had a crisis of confidence that their style and music alone weren't enough - so rather than trying to compete, they started playing a different game. And in both cases, they disavowed their earlier music... which really comes over as sour grapes...

    I think John Sykes had it right - despite the new wave of super shredders, he just carried on being himself and lost no respect for it. As did John Norum. Ironic, as both of them owe most of their style to Gary! Nobody (who knows what they're talking about) would compare Norum's or Sykes' technical prowess to any of the newer breed of players, but they BOTH proved that didn't matter. They still had plenty of chops and played exciting stuff. I think it was Dave who once said something like "nobody needs to play any faster than Michael Schenker"... which I agree with to a certain extent. 


    Right or wrong, people make their choices.

    Absolutely. It's worth noting that when John Sykes first heard Yngwie, he said he was so disheartened, he felt like changing career (this is from Anders Johansson's autobiography - original Blue Murder and ex-Yngwie drummer, which is sadly only available in Swedish, but it's a great read). Of course he would have been wrong to quit, but even so - he still had that crisis of self-confidence, even if it was just momentarily. It's sad that Gary and Vivian couldn't get past it. I guess it's a confidence thing - or maybe they had depressive personalities?

    My own depression, anxiety and lack of self-confidence still wreaks havoc on my guitar playing to this day - and I don't make a living from it or have a reputation to uphold. So for guys who were at the top of their career, that sort of thing would be an unbelievable nightmare. It doesn't matter how many people think you rock - if you don't believe in yourself, you can't do it. 

    So whilst I lament Gary, Vivian etc. losing their will to rock, I actually feel a great deal of sympathy for them, rather than feeling angry at them. As a huge hard-rock-Gary fan, I understand the frustration though.
    Post edited by Andy G on
  • I'm not so sure that the YJM factor really caused either guy to give up, as it were.  Both guys continued to play heavy rock/metal for several years after YJM bomb went off in 1983 -- the Alcatraz album. Same year as Holy Diver, Victims of the Future, and Thunder and Lightning.  So whatever impact YJM may have had, none of those players stopped what they were doing or really tried to change anything about their style.  

    As for Gary, he seemed to run out of rock ideas, and 89's After the War kind of proved that. In that first Blues video, when asked about the direction change, he said "certain songs on After the War sounded like songs on Run for Cover (and to a degree, Wild Frontier, too)," and he was absolutely right about that.  I thought he'd go off, make a blues album, and come back fresh, and carry on.  It never occurred to me that he'd never come back to a rock solo career, stay in the blues, or worse, put out those terrible albums that were neither.  But the blues thing took off for him (financially) and the rest is history.  

    I remain disappointed, but I don't figure Gary really owes me or us anything. His rock playing was and remains hugely influential on me, and others. 

    You can't really say Campbell post-DIO, "lost the will to rock." He simply followed the money and went from one great gig to another. He kept playing Dino style solos through the Whitesnake tour days (also late 80s), so that also belies the YJM effect causing him to change. He ends up in Def Leppard, which still certainly is a rock band. I have no idea what eventually caused his ALD lead-approach, or why he ended up playing like he did/does in Def Leppard. But it would seem his ALD died when RJD died. 

    My gripe with Campbell is that he really disavowed all the Dio stuff and his playing style at that time. Then, as soon as Dio died, he ran back to it like a little bitch, and began cashing-in on it (he MUST make more money with DL). I don't begrudge fans wanting to see it, but I thought it was less than classless, on VIv's part. I would have had more respect for him if he'd buried the hatchet with RJD and done a reunion tour. I think RJD would have JUMPED at the chance to get the original band back together. The last incarnations of the DIO band were terrible. Probably why he went back to Iommi. If Campbell had played a reunion tour with RJD, and then wanted to carry on after Ronnie died, I think I'd have had almost no problem with that scenario. 

    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,797
    edited February 3
    Quote: "Andy G said:
    Absolutely. It's worth noting that when John Sykes first heard Yngwie, he said he was so disheartened, he felt like changing career (this is from Anders Johansson's autobiography - original Blue Murder and ex-Yngwie drummer, which is sadly only available in Swedish, but it's a great read). Of course he would have been wrong to quit, but even so - he still had that crisis of self-confidence, even if it was just momentarily. It's sad that Gary and Vivian couldn't get past it. I guess it's a confidence thing - or maybe they had depressive personalities?

    My own depression, anxiety and lack of self-confidence still wreaks havoc on my guitar playing to this day - and I don't make a living from it or have a reputation to uphold. So for guys who were at the top of their career, that sort of thing would be an unbelievable nightmare. It doesn't matter how many people think you rock - if you don't believe in yourself, you can't do it. 

    So whilst I lament Gary, Vivian etc. losing their will to rock, I actually feel a great deal of sympathy for them, rather than feeling angry at them. As a huge hard-rock-Gary fan, I understand the frustration though."



    How odd that John would feel intimidated, he has played with a lot of heart and emotion (same with Gary). To me, players who play mostly with their hearts instead of just fingers/minds, no matter whether they're Yngwie or Albert King, are more than valid and a vital addition to the guitar world. Campbell also spoke of being intimidated, and his playing went downhill fast after that.

    In fact, it hurts me more about Campbell, who in Dio I had great admiration for. In some ways he was like Gary playing for Ronnie, with that blessed, very youthful enthusiasm. I can't understand who would judge any of those players harshly for not playing like (and/or as fast) as Malmsteen (unless said judges were thirteen or fourteen and just picking up guitar). The fact that such accomplished guitarists would let that effect them that much is astonishing to me.

    I have some of the same anxiety factors in my playing, Andy. But none of them have to do with someone else's playing. It's mostly a matter of being a ridiculously dogged perfectionist and hating myself for flubbing anything. There was also a point where playing was effortless for me, but due to having picked up new studies and disciplines in music I put the guitar away and lost a lot of what I'd gained...and get bummed out and frustrated trying to play at that level again.
    Post edited by Haffner on
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,797
    edited February 3


    My gripe with Campbell is that he really disavowed all the Dio stuff and his playing style at that time. Then, as soon as Dio died, he ran back to it like a little bitch, and began cashing-in on it (he MUST make more money with DL). I don't begrudge fans wanting to see it, but I thought it was less than classless, on VIv's part. I would have had more respect for him if he'd buried the hatchet with RJD and done a reunion tour. I think RJD would have JUMPED at the chance to get the original band back together. The last incarnations of the DIO band were terrible. Probably why he went back to Iommi. If Campbell had played a reunion tour with RJD, and then wanted to carry on after Ronnie died, I think I'd have had almost no problem with that scenario. 

    I'll never forget reading an interview he did several years before Ronnie Dio died, relating how people at Leppard concerts would see him and shout stuff like "Holy Diver" and "Last in Line!" and how he couldn't believe people still remembered those songs. Even the best songs he'd collaborated with in Def Leppard couldn't hold a candle to the worse he did in Dio imo. 

    To be as crystal as possible: absolutely nothing he'd done in Leppard compared to the Dio years imo...

    I should mention that I mean no offense to Def Leppard fans (I really liked High and Dry and Pyromania, after that ugh). 
    Post edited by Haffner on
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,480
    edited February 3
    Whatever you think of DL, you know, if I were the DL guys hiring Viv Campbell, thinking YEAH! we're getting the guitar hero of DIO, he'll be a great asset! I'd be mighty disappointed at what they ACTUALLY got out of him.  Seems to me they could have hired anyone nameless and gotten the same less-that-generic output they've had from Viv.  
    Post edited by Dinosaur David B on
    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,797
    Whatever you think of DL, you know, if I were the DL guys hiring Viv Campbell, thinking YEAH! we're getting the guitar hero of DIO, he'll be a great asset! I'd be mighty disappointed at what they ACTUALLY got out of him.  Seems to me they could have hired anyone nameless and gotten the same less-that-generic output they've had from Viv.  

    That sums it up perfectly.
  • Andy GAndy G Posts: 996
    Regarding Viv in DL, I don’t know if you guys remember this, but the hot rumour was that Steve Clark’s replacement was going to be John Sykes - to which there was a massive backlash from the fans about how he’d be a terrible fit. Joe Elliot responded to the rumours and said publicly that as much as he admired Sykes, his guitar style wasn’t suitable, but he said whoever they chose had to be a Brit. And whilst Viv has never been a shredder like Sykes, his style wasn’t that far off. If he’d played like he did in Dio, I don’t think DL fans would have liked it. He’d have been great for High n Dry or even Pyromania era DL, but not the soft rock version. 

    As for the YJM factor, whilst he burst into the scene in 83, he really hit the mainstream metal consciousness with Hear n Aid. Viv was quite open about being intimidated by Yng and it was at exactly that time of the Hear n Aid sessions when he told Ronnie that he didn’t want to be a guitar hero any more. He admitted in later interviews how he’d tried to update his style to match Yngwie and co, but just couldn’t do it. 

    David Coverdale said that he picked Vivian to do “that wacky American guitar hero” style because it was something Vandenberg didn’t do and he thought the audience wanted it. Even so, his playing with WS was considerably toned down from the Dio stuff, he slowed down a lot and ditched the frantic picking for a cleaner, more legato style. It’s as if he was scared to do it - that aggressive, blurry, chopping at the strings that he and Gary used to do became unacceptable in the mid-late 80s once the likes of Vinnie Moore, Tony Macalpine and Paul Gilbert started to gain attention. People could play that fast but be accurate AS WELL. It was no longer YJM as an anomaly, but more and more guys were reaching that standard - that would be 86/87. The “shred factor” was very much the cause of Viv’s “ALD”. I think he disavowed his playing in Dio because he felt embarrassed by it - he’d given it his best shot but suddenly it appeared very dated and he couldn’t move with the times. So it became sour grapes for him :( 
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,797
    edited February 4
    Andy G said:
    Regarding Viv in DL, I don’t know if you guys remember this, but the hot rumour was that Steve Clark’s replacement was going to be John Sykes - to which there was a massive backlash from the fans about how he’d be a terrible fit. Joe Elliot responded to the rumours and said publicly that as much as he admired Sykes, his guitar style wasn’t suitable, but he said whoever they chose had to be a Brit. And whilst Viv has never been a shredder like Sykes, his style wasn’t that far off. If he’d played like he did in Dio, I don’t think DL fans would have liked it. He’d have been great for High n Dry or even Pyromania era DL, but not the soft rock version. 

    As for the YJM factor, whilst he burst into the scene in 83, he really hit the mainstream metal consciousness with Hear n Aid. Viv was quite open about being intimidated by Yng and it was at exactly that time of the Hear n Aid sessions when he told Ronnie that he didn’t want to be a guitar hero any more. He admitted in later interviews how he’d tried to update his style to match Yngwie and co, but just couldn’t do it. 

    David Coverdale said that he picked Vivian to do “that wacky American guitar hero” style because it was something Vandenberg didn’t do and he thought the audience wanted it. Even so, his playing with WS was considerably toned down from the Dio stuff, he slowed down a lot and ditched the frantic picking for a cleaner, more legato style. It’s as if he was scared to do it - that aggressive, blurry, chopping at the strings that he and Gary used to do became unacceptable in the mid-late 80s once the likes of Vinnie Moore, Tony Macalpine and Paul Gilbert started to gain attention. People could play that fast but be accurate AS WELL. It was no longer YJM as an anomaly, but more and more guys were reaching that standard - that would be 86/87. The “shred factor” was very much the cause of Viv’s “ALD”. I think he disavowed his playing in Dio because he felt embarrassed by it - he’d given it his best shot but suddenly it appeared very dated and he couldn’t move with the times. So it became sour grapes for him :( 
    Great insights, Andy. I've learned over the years I prefer that choppy style over the super accurate. It just sounds more human, I guess. 

    But hey, I picked up things from Mr. Malmsteen, too. I just like players like classic Gary and Vivian more. To give full credit to Yngwie, he NEVER sold out or "progressed" to another style. He stuck to his guns and is today considered easily one of the top 10 greatest Rock guitarists ever (far above both Vivian and Gary...and John, for that matter). The man remains massively influential, and rightly so.
    Post edited by Haffner on
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