Yvette Young

I stumbled on videos of this young lady the other day. Her music is not something I'd be listening to for hours, and not remotely dino, but watching her play turns it into something mesmerizing. I wish I'd have a fraction of her picking/tapping chops (and it turns out she's no slouch on the violin and piano too). 


Comments

  • M11M11 Posts: 828
    Mesmerizing indeed, her tapping technique reminded me a lot of Stanley Jordan.
    Probably merits a thread of its own but, what's up with these guitars with slanted frets? Has anyone here played one? What are the pros and cons?
  • StitselStitsel Posts: 2,042
    I discovered her about a year ago, just didn't think of discussing her here......

    She's super cute & a monster guitar player, at what she does.More power to her! 
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,435
    M11 said:
    Mesmerizing indeed, her tapping technique reminded me a lot of Stanley Jordan.
    Probably merits a thread of its own but, what's up with these guitars with slanted frets? Has anyone here played one? What are the pros and cons?
    I was also reminded of Stanley Jordan. She is impressive and very melodic. Guitar playing like this I almost can not comprehend as a player....so it is nice to watch and enjoy for a little while. It does not hold my attention for long though...probably because I am a knuckle dragging pentatonic rock/metal player. I'm just a simple caveman...her world frightens me...
  • StitselStitsel Posts: 2,042
    Ha....exactly!
  • AgrippaAgrippa Posts: 5,913
    edited August 2019
    M11 said:
    Mesmerizing indeed, her tapping technique reminded me a lot of Stanley Jordan.
    Probably merits a thread of its own but, what's up with these guitars with slanted frets? Has anyone here played one? What are the pros and cons?
    I bought a 7 string Strandberg Boden Fusion with slanted frets about a year ago. Yvette was one of the reasons I bought it. I don´t really like her music, it´s like really inane New Age on steroids and meth to me, yuck ! but shes a great player.
    The slanted frets are a great idea when you play seven or eight strings, since the thicker lower strings need longer scale length to sound right, they just do.
    Ever wondered why Bass guitars usually have longer fretboards than guitars, or why concert pianos are longest on the bass side ?
    Well, now you know why.
    Playing wise theres no advantage imo, even though the makers usually have some story about better ergonomics, which I have serious doubts about. You do however get used to the slanted frets very very quickly, in my case after a few minuttes.


    Post edited by Agrippa on
  • EugenicScumEugenicScum Posts: 5,323
    Hours? I don't know, I couldn't do 2 minutes.  :'(
    Check out my band: Bevar Sea
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 1,862
    edited September 2019
    This sort of thing reminds me of what I usually answer when people ask me why I have never bothered with 7+ string instruments. I am nowhere close to the level I want to be with a 6 string. Plus, Schenker and Moore can do things I can't even fathom and kick the living shit out of a lot of guys playing with way more intricate axes (Not to take anything away from this girl. Her skill level is impressive. I mean some modern metal guys).

    I think as far as the complex stuff goes, I draw the line at the 70's and 80's prog guys. I still enjoy DiMeola every now and then. But in the end, I get way more enjoyment of the average rock player playing power chords and blazing thru a pentatonic melodic solo more often than not.
    Post edited by Tatosh Guitar on
  • StitselStitsel Posts: 2,042
    Exactly. All the old Dino gods we grew up listening to didn't need 7 strings, period. EVH. You think Dave Murray & Adrian Smith needed 7 strings, or to tune down? All the metal shredders from the 80s wrote killer tunes (that's why they're better than 99% that came after them ) and could lay down some serious licks....they were more creative than a lot of latter day players & really wrung everything they could out of the instrument.They didn't need a gimmick....I'm not sorry, but a lot of these 7 string guys aren't doing anything groundbreaking, or new...in fact, a lot of them just copy each other, tone wise, riff wise, song structure wise.I am not saying they're all like that.There's some good stuff out there for sure.
    But most of the innovative stuff is still done on good 'ol fashioned 6 strings IMO.
  • The SeekerThe Seeker Posts: 593
    Concur with what's been said so far.  She's very skilled and interviews really well.
    She's got a new sig Ibanez Talman (the one I saw at NAMM is a fuck ugly slime green colour).

    But, it takes me 2 minutes to get past the skill thing and then I just hear a never ending tonal splurge.  It just doesn't change.

    Tapping should be done like Guthrie.  Brief and meaningful
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 1,862


    Tapping should be done like Guthrie.  Brief and meaningful

    I doesn't even need to be brief if done right. Vito Bratta and Reb Beach can play entire lead sections with tapping and still sound awesome, not to mention that those usually sound like actual mini compositions, not just random wankery.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,876
    edited January 21
    Hours? I don't know, I couldn't do 2 minutes.  :'(
    I just can't get into the style, and found myself overall pretty unimpressed. But this is coming from someone who wants blood-and-guts passion almost solely when I listen to guitar. I'll take Malmsteen at his most overplaying/over-effected worse before ever listening to this again.

    But hey, good for her. She's playing what she loves. I don't get much impressed by technique anymore, it seems to me too many people are doing it, and it makes me think to much of approaching practicing like a video game. Hit the right frets as fast as you can and you win a "WOW" from guitar novices!

    No offense or disrespect meant to fans of the style.
    Post edited by Haffner on
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,763
    It's definitely not something I'd listen to (except as background music), but I wouldn't call it random wankery. To me, it seems the style of music she's working in is inspired by minimalist composers like Steve Reich, Terry Riley or Philip Glass - I'm thinking of how it is based on a repetitive structure with little incremental modifications. Of course, this has nothing to do with rock music, it's a very different trip, but I bet a lot of thought went into it. 



  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,876
    It's definitely not something I'd listen to (except as background music), but I wouldn't call it random wankery. To me, it seems the style of music she's working in is inspired by minimalist composers like Steve Reich, Terry Riley or Philip Glass - I'm thinking of how it is based on a repetitive structure with little incremental modifications. Of course, this has nothing to do with rock music, it's a very different trip, but I bet a lot of thought went into it. 



    She is a master of odd time signatures, very tough to play what she's playing (especially when she makes it look so easy).
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,876
    It's definitely not something I'd listen to (except as background music), but I wouldn't call it random wankery. To me, it seems the style of music she's working in is inspired by minimalist composers like Steve Reich, Terry Riley or Philip Glass - I'm thinking of how it is based on a repetitive structure with little incremental modifications. Of course, this has nothing to do with rock music, it's a very different trip, but I bet a lot of thought went into it. 



    Oh sure, I probably put things wrong. These are obviously mini-compositions, and are worthy of a different type of appreciation. 

    Usually when I'm in the mood for that kind of different guitar composition I just throw on Holdsworth. I can't seem to get much into less distorted guitar...I fall asleep at too much acoustic for instance.
  • TravisWTravisW Posts: 988
    She's obviously very talented, and I think that some of the ideas in that piece would be very cool integrated into a different type of composition. I think the tapped part is neat, but doesn't have enough of a standalone musical presence to serve as the "main course" of a composition. I had a part on the Echoes in the Dark album that was like the beginner's version of what she's doing tapping-wise. My opinion there was similar - neat idea, but needs a significant musical supporting cast because it boils down to just being cleverly done arpeggiation. 
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