Beast From The East

I recently rediscovered this album.  I'd forgotten how ruthlessly savage it is.  The live versions of these tracks absolutely slay their studio counterparts.  Sure, it's not a true "live" album in that a lot of the vocals and backing vocals were redone in the studio, but IMHO that doesn't detract from George, Jeff and Mick's performance on this sonic blitzkrieg.

And as for, George...

Holy.  Shit.

He fucking goes off.  Compare the studio version of Kiss of Death:


to the live version:


As far as I am concerned, Beast From the East is the definitive Dokken album, and the best work George has ever done. 

I rarely hear much discussion about this album when live albums are discussed, so I figured I'd give it some love.  For me, one of the definitive landmarks of '80s guitar and the Sunset Strip scene. 

And George, goddamn, did he kick everybody's ass on this one.  Randy, Michael, Adrian, Dave, Glenn, KK, Matthias, etc their live albums all featured faithful, polite renditions of their studio work. 

George used his studio work as a foundation to channel all the rage and aggression he was feeling towards Don at the time and went for the jugular.

Comments

  • SirionSirion Posts: 3,115
    This album is pretty much everything I love about rock guitar condensed to its essence. <3
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,486
    I'm not sure I like it songwise, as much as Lock & Key or Tooth and Nail, but I do like it and it's a good album, and possibly George's best guitar work in Dokken.

    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,322
    I have that album on vinyl but just bought a used copy on CD yesterday. It is a great live album and George smokes on it. The live version of Mr. Scary is impressive for the mere fact that it is only one guitar recreating multiple guitar tracks from the studio version....and he pulls it off well. I saw him do that song with Lynch Mob live in a club in Wilmington, NC back in 1990 and it was sick.
  • SirionSirion Posts: 3,115
    edited July 2019
    This album has, in fact, received some important yet easy-to-overlook ironic accolades over the years. Rolling Stone, that epitome of the worst of music critic pretense, gave the album the lowest possible mark:


    Chris Cornell, however, seems to have been intimidated enough by the album that he tried to gaslight the Grammy commitee and general audience into doubting whether Dokken should qualify as heavy metal ahead of the 1990 Grammy awards:


    Adversaries such as these are to the credit of any band, and in this case their enmity is well-deserved indeed.
    Post edited by Sirion on
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,322
    That Rolling Stone review read like that of a guy who A. Did not listen to the album at all and B. Has a bias against L.A. hard rock and metal and C. A bias against Dokken

    As far as live albums go in the late 80's 'Beast From The East' was one of the best

    The giveaway for me that the author did not bother to listen to the album or at least most of it is that he says "....guitar solos that go nowhere..." Huh? The guitar soloing on that album is some of the best work George has done....and also he says "...harmonies so off that the singers sound as if they were shouting different songs, cries of "Are you ready for a rock & roll party tonight?" Ok for one....the harmonies are not off....Pilson was an excellent vocalist and could harmonize with anything Don sang and secondly that last part of the statement makes absolutely no sense. The guy isn't even a good writer let alone music critic...sounds about right for Rolling Stone.
  • SirionSirion Posts: 3,115
    edited July 2019
    Yup. I hope they put it in their press kit.
    Post edited by Sirion on
  • I have never purchased a single Rolling Stone magazine in my life.  I've thumbed through a few at the library, sure.  But I've never bought one and can't understand how anyone ever did back in the day.

    It was mostly ads fer crissakes.  You were buying advertisements.  There was some content, but damned if it wasn't drowned out and lost behind a tsunami of Madison Ave jizz-bombs.  

    I can't imagine what kind of bitch-ass pussy would buy that pigshit rag just so their love for Elvis Costello could be validated when they finally found and read the review that was buried behind twenty Hugo Boss and Calvin Klein ads.
  • Andy GAndy G Posts: 996
    ROFLMFAO @ Grunge-garden's singer whining about Dokken not being metal!!! 
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 1,700
    My official intro to Dokken. I used to listen to that one in my car all the time. Lynch struck me as a true LA gunslinger, in the same vein of EVH and Rhoads. They sure filled all the spaces in their live stuff.

    I haven't listened to it on ages. I am more used to the studio versions these days, but when I listen to it I am always reminded of what a monster player George is. Also, Pilson is awesome. Don was always the weak spot with these guys.
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 1,700
    Andy G said:
    ROFLMFAO @ Grunge-garden's singer whining about Dokken not being metal!!! 
    Speaking of, ever thought about covering  a Lynch solo for your video series, Andy? ;)
  • bourbonsamuraibourbonsamurai Posts: 1,488
    Duojett71 said:
    I have that album on vinyl but just bought a used copy on CD yesterday. It is a great live album and George smokes on it. The live version of Mr. Scary is impressive for the mere fact that it is only one guitar recreating multiple guitar tracks from the studio version....and he pulls it off well. I saw him do that song with Lynch Mob live in a club in Wilmington, NC back in 1990 and it was sick.
    i was at that show.  lol.  agreed
  • Andy GAndy G Posts: 996
    Andy G said:
    ROFLMFAO @ Grunge-garden's singer whining about Dokken not being metal!!! 
    Speaking of, ever thought about covering  a Lynch solo for your video series, Andy? ;)
    I did Unchain the Night and the Hunter a while back. I'm a bit burned out on the video stuff tbh.
  • Tatosh GuitarTatosh Guitar Posts: 1,700
    Oh yeah, I remember now. Those were very cool. You gave me an unheard appreciation on The Hunter.
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,322
    My official intro to Dokken. I used to listen to that one in my car all the time. Lynch struck me as a true LA gunslinger, in the same vein of EVH and Rhoads. They sure filled all the spaces in their live stuff.

    I haven't listened to it on ages. I am more used to the studio versions these days, but when I listen to it I am always reminded of what a monster player George is. Also, Pilson is awesome. Don was always the weak spot with these guys.
    If there was a weak spot....maybe...since Pilson brought a lot to the table with songwriting, backing vocals, competent bass playing and Mick Brown is a monster and underrated drummer. However I always felt Don never got the proper credit as a singer on those first 4 Dokken albums. I thought he got a bad rap as too clean. I thought the guy had some pipes back in the day, was a great melodic singer who did have some power and grit when he wanted to. The 'Back For The Attack' album is proof of that. So are tracks like "Tooth And Nail", "Light Strikes Again", "When Heaven Comes Down", etc. I always thought back in the day Don was a great singer. 
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