VH 5150

Always felt this was very disappointing and a terrible follow up to 1984. The three singles the only decent tracks and perhaps Summer Nights.
Good Enough....plain embarrassing rap and vox from Sam.  OU812 was a lot better in my view.
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Comments

  • SanchoSancho Posts: 18,123
    I love 5150. OU812 slightly less but then they came back and tore us a new one with FUCK.
  • Old SchoolOld School Posts: 750
    OU812 was a lot better in my view.
    Yeah, I disliked 5150 and pretty much stopped listening to it after EEAS was released. Title track is great, though.

    Enjoyed OU812 much more.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,228
    edited April 21
    Sancho said:
    I love 5150.


    Me too, in fact besides Balance it's the only Hagar VH I own and listen to. Now that I think about it, in my humble estimation 5150 really wasn't either radically different or worse than 1984.

    1984 for me was mostly Panama, the title track (easily one of the most musically interesting VH tracks), and, well, EDWARD. Drop Dead Legs featured some spectacular, abstract solos that never fail to impress me. I adore the solos to Jump, I'll Wait, and of course I prefer 1984 on those strengths.

    But 5150 featured Hagar just PEAKING OUT. I couldn't believe it...I thought he sounded better than he did with Montrose. VH played some insane solos on that album, and there isn't a song on 1984 that I love as much as Dreams.

    I recall first hearing Dreams (first time ever hearing VH/Hagar) in a terrible Florida jail in the mid 80s, knowing it was VH but being surprised by who I guessed was an unknown singer. I was blown away by the vocal, the wonderful solos, everything. It took me a full listen to realize it was Hagar, and I rated him right up there with Coverdale, Dio, Dickinson at the time...definitely. That song just hit at the right time...and it never stopped hitting. I adore that song, it might even be my favorite by them, period (and I'm a retardedly huge fan of Roth VH).

    Anyways just a bunch of my opinions. I love both 84 and 5150 very much.

    Post edited by Haffner on
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 7,932
    edited April 21
    I thoroughly disliked it, up to the point that I gave up on VH after that album... However I had nothing against the replacement of DLR by Sammy. But I naively expected something like a cross between Montrose and early VH. Instead, what I got was, in my opinion, a low-energy album with a few uninspired rockers, an horrid AOR ballad, a Jump 2, a funky tune, all served with godawful synths - even Eddie’s guitar tone is processed like never before. Of course, they were in fact just pushing further the more commercial aspects of 1984.  That's just me though, nothing inherently wrong with a different side of VH, just really not my cup of tea...   
    Post edited by Seven Moons on
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 15,949
    Let's please not do another DLR vs. Sammy thread -- or anything that will descend into that.  If you liked VH with Sammy, chances are you liked 5150.
    Life is easier, so much easier, life is easier now.
  • Let's please not do another DLR vs. Sammy thread -- or anything that will descend into that.  If you liked VH with Sammy, chances are you liked 5150.


    Sure, I love both versions of VH but 5150 simply didn't work for me.

  • OskyOsky Posts: 832
    I'm not keen on the production or Ed's guitar tone on the LP, but this and Balance are my two faves of the Van Hagar era ...I also love the track Humans Being from 96 just before Hagar exited. As others have said the title track is awesome and I also enjoy Summer Nights and Dreams. Took me about a year to come to terms with the loss of Roth tho, I had to view it as a different band... and I was a big fan of Sammy's solo stuff from the late 70s to early 80s.
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,861
    edited April 22
    I've always found 1984 to be the mixed bag of the two, to be honest. The singles are iconic, but the rest? There are evidences in there of Van Halen's more refined sense of harmony, but most of the lesser known tracks are throwaway songs in my opinion. Drop Dead Legs? I'll Wait? Girl Gone Bad? House of Pain? I'd take 5150 over those any day. 5150 presented a very different band, but also a band that was more consistent and could stand on more legs. (I like both incarnations) And not to forget: DLR also managed to present more consistently interesting material for at least three albums thereafter. In hindsight the writing on the wall may have been captured on tape here…
    Post edited by Sirion on
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 7,932
    Sirion said:
    And not to forget: DLR also managed to present more consistently interesting material for at least three albums thereafter. In hindsight the writing on the wall may have been captured on tape here…
    Indeed :+1: 
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,228

    For some reason, the post VH Roth material just didn't do it for me. Eat 'Em and Smile bombed for me for my simple dislike of Vai's playing and songwriting, and the one after was way too MTV for me (that goes for a lot of the post-5150 VH too, no offence to fans of OU812 and the lot). The rest of the stuff sounded like Hard Rock goes Las Vegas to me. He never put out a single solo song that I liked anywhere near the worse song during Roth's stint in VH. To me VH proved he could pull off working with another, very different, singer; Roth just reheated and kept serving the same old, with guitarists who were mostly kinda similar to VH.

    Just my opinion.

  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 7,932

    You're making a great point Andy. The main reason I liked Eat Em And Smile is precisely because it sounded more like old VH than VH’s new direction. For similar reasons, I like Halford’s Resurrection album better than the Ripper-era Priest: even though the songs on Resurrection are not at the same level as Priest classics, they sounded like something you'd expect from JP, more than what JP themselves were doing at that time, IMO.  

    I also agree about the « Hard Rock goes Vegas » vibe, I didn’t mind too much, it’s a part of Diamond Dave’s persona… 

  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,228
    edited April 22

    You're making a great point Andy. The main reason I liked Eat Em And Smile is precisely because it sounded more like old VH than VH’s new direction. For similar reasons, I like Halford’s Resurrection album better than the Ripper-era Priest: even though the songs on Resurrection are not at the same level as Priest classics, they sounded like something you'd expect from JP, more than what JP themselves were doing at that time, IMO.  

    I also agree about the « Hard Rock goes Vegas » vibe, I didn’t mind too much, it’s a part of Diamond Dave’s persona… 


    Oh, I think there's always at least a certain level of charm to Dave ("come on, Dave, gimme a break!"). To me he kind of fell victim to what Ozzy and even Ronnie Dio (later) became as solo performers: too much like caricatures of themselves. Different people have different opinions regarding where this happened, and certainly Dio can lay claim to at least trying different things (mostly with Andy Gavin's favorite guitarist, Tracy G). Roth and Ozzy just gave people product.

    Again, no disrespect meant whatsoever to fans.

    Post edited by Haffner on
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,861
    Haffner said:

    For some reason, the post VH Roth material just didn't do it for me. Eat 'Em and Smile bombed for me for my simple dislike of Vai's playing and songwriting, and the one after was way too MTV for me (that goes for a lot of the post-5150 VH too, no offence to fans of OU812 and the lot). The rest of the stuff sounded like Hard Rock goes Las Vegas to me. He never put out a single solo song that I liked anywhere near the worse song during Roth's stint in VH. To me VH proved he could pull off working with another, very different, singer; Roth just reheated and kept serving the same old, with guitarists who were mostly kinda similar to VH.

    Just my opinion.

    I can definitely see that. Solo DLR is something I'd rather have in small doses, but reading this I realized that I have been playing those records a lot more the last decade than 1984, which is pretty much played out for me: I don't need to hear the three huge hits any more, and the rest is filler to my ears. Is has its charms and quirks, but that's it.
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,861
    Just listening to 5150 again for the first time in a while, inspired by this thread. I've never realized before, somehow, but Eddie probably owes Blackmore money for the Get Up riff ;)
  • mr_crowleymr_crowley Posts: 6,132
    I've not listened to this one in ages (spinning it right now) but it might be my fav Van Halen. As good as that first record and some really bad ass songs throughout I always preferred Hagar- to the Roth-era. It just seemed like much proper songs (which the Swede in my appreciates ;) ). I get that it is sort of the attraction of those early reckless tunes but it sometimes gets a little to jam-y jive-y with Roth IMO. The peaks are incredibly high but there are some pretty spotty material as well...

    For me personally the split was the best thing that could happen. As I think Hagar-era Van Halen is pretty kick ass and LOVE David Lee Roth's solo stuff. Those records he made with Vai bends my mind!
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