The DRG Attitude Toward Sampling

It's amazing to me how much samples are impacting our current musical world; over the years pre-recorded bit are being used  progressively more, and the compositions featuring them sound way less clumsy and obvious than "Can't Touch This".

I'm interested in finding out more about how our hallowed Dino members view samples and sampling, and whether or not they use them in their own recordings.

I personally find samples useful for sound design, however I'm not interested in using them for anything but layering over my own, mostly formed, compositons. Making a sample the main point of a piece, to me, isn't really composing, it's editing.

Really curious about others' feelings on this, apparently hugely important aspect of musicmaking. It almost never (if ever) comes up here (and I at least partly sympathize with this).

Comments

  • M11M11 Posts: 641
    Do you refer to sampling song bits (the way hip-hop and rap have done for years) or using sound samples from instruments?
    If the former, I believe there is a fine line between editing, like you said, and an original composition. Funky Cold Medina by Tone Lōc sampled "Honky Tonk Women" by The Rolling Stones, "Hot Blooded" by Foreigner, "Christine Sixteen" by Kiss, "All Right Now" by Free, '"You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet" by BTO yet the song sounds nothing like any of those songs, whereas you have Vanilla Ice and Ice Ice Baby which will always bring Queen's Under Pressure to mind. So my opinion is, sampling, when done well, can become a valid composition on its own.
    If the latter, as a synth enthusiast I must say I love how sampling enables me to have on my iPad sounds from synths worth thousands of dollars which otherwise I could not have available. As a sonic tool, I'm all for sound samples. (BTW I don't know if guitar amp modeling works through sampling, I believe they don't).


  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,331
    M11 said:
    Do you refer to sampling song bits (the way hip-hop and rap have done for years) or using sound samples from instruments?
    If the former, I believe there is a fine line between editing, like you said, and an original composition. Funky Cold Medina by Tone Lōc sampled "Honky Tonk Women" by The Rolling Stones, "Hot Blooded" by Foreigner, "Christine Sixteen" by Kiss, "All Right Now" by Free, '"You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet" by BTO yet the song sounds nothing like any of those songs, whereas you have Vanilla Ice and Ice Ice Baby which will always bring Queen's Under Pressure to mind. So my opinion is, sampling, when done well, can become a valid composition on its own.
    If the latter, as a synth enthusiast I must say I love how sampling enables me to have on my iPad sounds from synths worth thousands of dollars which otherwise I could not have available. As a sonic tool, I'm all for sound samples. (BTW I don't know if guitar amp modeling works through sampling, I believe they don't).


    I agree! As far as guitar amp modeling, (if you haven't yet) try Guitar Rig vst, and look up IR files featuring a player/sound  you like. You can take that IR and run it through Reflektor in Guitar Rig and get some at times strikingly good sounds in the box. Not just that, but you can experiment with different waveforms via the same engine. I imagine you have at least a firm understanding of wavetables, given your synths? The possibilities seem endless when you add in that factor.

    For synths I'm a huge fan of u-he: Zebra/HZ, Diva, Bazille, Sylenth, Nave, Alchemy, Arturia's ARP 2600 and Mini V, I have made literally hundreds of presets for the U-he and Nave synths alone for my music. Getting my sound design chops up became a priority the last several years.

  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 16,059
    edited April 20
    From a business perspective, you're better off playing it (or recreating it) yourself, because these days, you have to pay the artist to "clear" a sample.  From the artistic standpoint of how people originally used it -- to profit off of other peoples' work, I've never been cool with that, and never respected the approach of basing your "art" on someone else's finished work, calling it your own, and cashing in on it -- whether it was rappers and hip hop artists doing it from samples, or whether it was Zeppelin ripping off old bluesmen.   
    Post edited by Dinosaur David B on
    Life is easier, so much easier, life is easier now.
  • BytorBytor Posts: 1,250
    edited April 20
    We "Ariel's Attic" use a lot of instrument samples all played/triggered via keyboard midi controller by either Bob or myself.

    As far as sampling some one else's work, I've never been a fan of that.
    Post edited by Bytor on
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,331
    Bytor said:
    We "Ariel's Attic" use a lot of instrument samples all played/triggered via keyboard midi controller by either Bob or myself.

    As far as sampling some one else's work, I've never been a fan of that.

    Hey, "Ariel's Attic" is really cool!
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 8,231
    edited April 21
    I like the idea of sampling soundbites from movie or TV shows....something that is relevant to the song....like what Iron Maiden did at the beginning of "The Prisoner". Sometimes I have thought hip hop artists have done it creatively and I enjoyed it as long as they gave the original artist credit.....but for the most part I have felt hip hop artists just took someone else's work to use as a hook because they were not creative enough to come up with something on their own....and I think that type of thing was way overdone in rap and modern R&B of the last 20-25 years. Bands like The Beastie Boys, Cypress Hill, Public Enemy and The Fun Lovin Criminals did it sparingly/tastefully and did not rely on it....while many others did...
    Post edited by Duojett71 on
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 2,815
    I don't care much about sampling on recorded music, but, if you go live, PLAY LIVE!
    Oh, playing live is more dificult and requires more personel, so more money.
    Well, don't put any sample, record what you can play, and play it well and loud.
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,004
    edited April 21
    I think sound samples, or instrument samples, can be a very interesting way to add textures or ambiences (after all, Pink Floyd were heavily using the idea at least 15 years before samples as we know them existed...)  Song samples are a different story IMO, it pisses me to no end when I hear a bit of whatever classic rock song in a shitty rap/hip-hop tune...  

    As for live situations, more and more bands seem to be relying way too much on pre-recorded stuff. I understand some arrangements can't be replicated live, but it's possible to play a song live without sounding exactly like on the studio album - that's what bands have been doing for years...  
    Post edited by Seven Moons on
  • M11M11 Posts: 641
    As for live situations, more and more bands seem to be relying way too much on pre-recorded stuff. I understand some arrangements can't be replicated live, but it's possible to play a song live without sounding exactly like on the studio album - that's what bands have been doing for years...  
    I was at a Queensrÿche show a couple of years and go and midway through the concert their sampling machine broke or something and they had to drop a couple of songs from the set (one of them being Silent Lucidity, which they improvised an acoustic version during the encore). So yeah, it can be dangerous to rely on too much pre-recorded stuff.
  • otcconanotcconan Posts: 5,589
    While I agree that "Funky Cold Medina," while sampling several songs, manages to make the whole thing a different "whole" as it were (as much as the Csus2 in "Open Arms" "samples" "Layla"),  Ton Loc surely does not get a pass for "Wild Thing," which any idiot can tell is "Jamie's Cryin'."

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