Lynch/DeMartini glissando vibrato

SirionSirion Posts: 2,880
Has anybody here mastered this technique? Any advice? My mind always boggles when looking at how seemlessly the two, and Lynch in particular, manages to incorporate this technique. I've tried, but never gotten it to sound anywhere near as good, both when it comes to the technique itself and actually using it in context: using it at a place of melodic rest doesn't come natural to me, unlike normal vibrato. But it would have been awesome to be able to develop both the technique and the ear to use it flawlessly and seamlessly.
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Comments

  • whoopass1whoopass1 Posts: 1,395
    I posted a video in another thread yesterday, where I actually use this technique. It doesn't replace my normal hand vibrato, and I tend to use it more as an effect....but it does sound COOL! I've seen Greg Howe employ it, too. I've never really practiced it. I just saw Lynch use it the first time I ever saw Dokken, (Tooth & Nail Tour), and I thought it sounded GREAT! So, I started doing it. Play with it a bit, and it will feel better to You the more you mess around with it.
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 2,815
    edited April 19
    Ritchie Kotzen, Pat Metheny, Gutrie Govan, and many many more.
    It's a mixture of vibrato and trill.

    I can do it, but I don't like very much. That's morphing into a standard, and I try avoiding standards (without actual succes on it =)).

    It's like the "go to slide down" (it's my own definition of what Joe Satriani and Steve Vai do a lot, and, after a while, became another standard).
    After months trying mastering that "reversed slide"... I hated, because it's so identificable like a "satrianish" that I try avoiding it.

    Now, the reverse slide and glissando vibrato are very common, and I hate a bit.
    Alec Hutchings do some of these.


    Post edited by eduardoritos on
  • Andy GAndy G Posts: 849
    I hope it disappears and never comes back. It's one of those hip techniques that everybody on YouTube feels compelled to do and I'm absolutely sick of it - right up there with hybrid picking.

    It's the modern equivalent of the sweep-tap from 10-15 years ago, 3 string sweeps from the late 80s and Eddie's tapping from the early 80s. PLEASE make it stop.


  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,880
    Well, that escalated quickly…
  • Andy GAndy G Posts: 849
    Sirion said:
    Well, that escalated quickly…
    Sorry mate. I couldn't help myself.
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,880
    edited April 19
    No worries, man. I don't really pay much attention to the YT crowd, so I had no idea they were up to this stuff. I do remember the sweep/tap thing, though, from my Guitar Techniques subscriber days (c. 2004–06). Like everything about that magazine it got stale very very quickly.

    And they never ran any lessons on glissando vibrato. :p
    Post edited by Sirion on
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,004
    edited April 19
    At first, I thought you were talking about some kind of violin-style vibrato (that is, parallel to the strings instead of perpendicular).  But I watched the video, I guess you're refering to the glissando moves at 1'24 and 1'30?  It sounds a bit spastic in the context of what he's playing... 
    Post edited by Seven Moons on
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,880
    edited April 19
    Nonono, I looked at that video (I wasn't the one posting it), and there is nothing like what I was talking about in there.



    The video doesn't start where I wanted it to, but look to 3.43 or so here. Seems like a simple effect, but I find it much harder to do it well, without any unwanted fluctuation of pitch, and to use it in a musical context, than one would assume.
    Post edited by Sirion on
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,880
    Or, I stand corrected, there is something in there at that point that sounds like it, but there is something else going on there too.
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,004
    Ah yes, it's a more controlled thing on this. Yeah, probably not easy to do cleanly, and to use in a melodic way. 
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 2,815
    Sirion said:
    Nonono, I looked at that video (I wasn't the one posting it), and there is nothing like what I was talking about in there.



    The video doesn't start where I wanted it to, but look to 3.43 or so here. Seems like a simple effect, but I find it much harder to do it well, without any unwanted fluctuation of pitch, and to use it in a musical context, than one would assume.
    Little off topic... Killer band.
    The more I watch to Jeff Pilson, the more I became a fan. Energetic, good singer, good player.
    And, six screw vibrato in the tiger guitar? Dind't expect that.
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,880
    edited April 22
    Strictly speaking it is only a two-screw vibrato (look closely ;) )

    But yes, how he keeps that thing in tune I have no idea.
    Post edited by Sirion on
  • jebbuddajebbudda Posts: 5,028
    I'm not sure what you guys are talking about ?

    Does the whammy bar have something to do with this ?

    Or when guys like Lynch go nuts hammering and pulling on one string ?

    I don't mind a few dive bombers once in a while . I think Satriani does some awesome tricks . I just don't want to hear him do it every 2 seconds .

    My favorite guys are the ones that make the bar sound like a slide . Michael Lee Firkins for example . Mind Blowing . Jeff Beck ....one of the masters IMHO .

    Floyd Rose created a legion of whammy masturbators . I assume that is what Andy finds so irritating ?
  • SirionSirion Posts: 2,880
    edited April 25
    I am talking about the emulation of a very wide vibrato by sliding up and down the neck. Some people call it jack-off vibrato, but as a music scholar I prefer a slightly more serious name. ;)



    Again the video doesn't start where I want it to, but if you skip to 13.35 there is an example of it at the end of the phrase Warren is playing.

    I wonder if the other guys are talking about something slightly different (I may not have been clear enough in my opening post), but I'll let them answer that question themselves.
    Post edited by Sirion on
  • jebbuddajebbudda Posts: 5,028
    OK . I gottcha .


    The whammy bar has nothing to do with that .


    That is a seriously aggressive technique . The West Coast California guys must have invented it . It reminds me of something Jake E Lee & George Lynch would take to extremes.

    EVH probably started doing it and his predecessors beat it to death . 

    If you can get that sliding technique going in both directions ,with different notes , on different strings, you might have something really cool .

    Steve Vai does something similar in the CROSSROADS duel when he slides up AND down on every possible " E " note on the neck . Its not easy .

    Guthrie Govan's solo album (Erotic Cakes ) starts off with a song called WAVES where he just kills this technique in the main melody while simultaneously controlling the over the top aggression used by Warren above .

    I think people thought you were referencing the wild trill pulloff freakouts accompanied by whammy warbling often associated with EVH . Then the post-EVH guys took his innovations and beat them to death . EVH was always tasteful IMHO . George Lynch was one of the first guys to cheapen some of EVH's cool stuff with guitar diarrhea .

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