Dinosaur Rock Guitar Hall Of Heavy Metal Fame Bands

13

Comments

  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,324
    Kiske has the high range, but he doesn't have (classic) Tate's low range.  Geoff Tate, EP - Promised Land is vocally in a class by himself. 
    Probably not....but Kiske had a good range and could sing in a lower register. I also thought Kiske had a more powerful voice than Tate.
  • mr_crowleymr_crowley Posts: 6,582
    inmyhands said:
    I'm interested in learning about the modern metal bands, (maybe post 2000), that some of our members have become enamored with. I'd like to think that music hasn't died and hope that among the "Ten" suggestions for a "Heavy Metal" Hall of Fame I might find some newer bands that have achieved a fan base among Dino members that would cause their inclusion in this thread.
              As for my second question .....

              If I asked for the 10 Best Heavy Metal Bands of the New Millennium would that help to focus your expertise on my problem?

    Rick

    To focus more on band's that are current and still maintaining values highly valued in Dino rock you can pretty much go two routes:

    1.) Retro or flashback bands that are new but sort of embracing and trying to sound like the bands of a bygone era. This is where I find most stuff that I really like. If i were you I would definitely check out Enforcer, The Struts, Skull Fist, Ghost and Graveyard (unfortuntely just broke up..) to get started. I can get back with more but those are some of my all time fave bands (including the classic era of bands) actually.

    2.) Then you have modern bands that still have sort of Dino touch to things. I think Seven Moons are one of the best guys to ask when it comes to this kind of music but I really think Santa Cruz are really cool and have gone in a very unique heavy way since their first album which was basically hot rodded good ol' hair metal. Lost Society is a cool band which is very metal but still got plenty of chops and use it in a cool way.
    Grand Theft Culture is an acquired taste, not sure I like 'em or not, but they sure bring something new to the table.


    If you get into that whole death- and black metal scene there are tons and tons of talented bands. Most of it really ain't my cup of tea so I can't comment further but there is tons of knowledge here on the board.
    Same with power metal, it has sort of died of the last 15 years or so but there are still a lot of great bands around out there. My champions Gamma Ray and Edguy are sure worth a shot but had been around for some time prior to 2000 (Gamma Ray was founded in like '90?).


    Now go on YouTube or Spotify and have some fun! ;)
  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,591
    Thank You mr_crowley. This gives me a lot of bands to look into. =)
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,805
    I've heard both Enforcer and Skull Fist, they're both really good (my fave is Skull Fist, they can be LOTS of fun to listen to).
  • Duojett71 said:
    Kiske has the high range, but he doesn't have (classic) Tate's low range.  Geoff Tate, EP - Promised Land is vocally in a class by himself. 
    Probably not....but Kiske had a good range and could sing in a lower register. I also thought Kiske had a more powerful voice than Tate.
    I was gonna reply to Dave's voice, but you beat me to it. Kiske has an ASTOUNDING low range as well. There's plenty of examples in the Helloween back catalog, but where he really shines is when he does his own thing. Like his Elvis covers...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA9Q3qy--EI

    A close friend always loved Kiske, but for some reason hated Tate. I never figured how that was possible, since to the untrained ear they are so close it's scary. He also insisted Kiske had more power. I actually showed him specific examples where they reached the same notes, but he still insists Kiske has a better set of lungs... Oh well...
  • Haffner said:

    I played Take Hold of the Flame and Queen of the Reich over and over back in the day. Other than that (and I LOVED Tate's voice), QR just never did much for me.

    Surprised.  Such amazingly DRAMATIC music.  Especially Mindcrime.
    If you watch the Operation Livecrime video with good audio, and still aren't swayed, I can't help you. 


    I worship Mindcrime. It's still probably in my top five albums of all time...The EP and Warning are amazing as well. I am quite surprised by Haffner's opinion on this... we usually agree on a lot of things....
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,805
    edited January 2017
     

    I worship Mindcrime. It's still probably in my top five albums of all time...The EP and Warning are amazing as well. I am quite surprised by Haffner's opinion on this... we usually agree on a lot of things....

    Sometimes bands/entertainers hit people differently. This will sound bizarre, but I preferred QR when they were showing their Priest roots, which for me was the two songs I mentioned above. I just can't get into their other music, I was more into Fates Warning at the time. No doubt, Tate ended up losing his influences and became one of the Elite. His band just never did anything for me, and I believe me, I've actually owned (and sold) Mindcrime on cd twice. It bores the hell out of me (no offense meant to fans). Silent Lucidity was the final nail in the coffin for me and that band (not a big Pink Floyd fan, either).

    Also not a fan at all of Helloween, but Fiske is an excellent singer. Not one of my favorites (I was never wild about his tone).

    Keep in mind this is a (strange) person who didn't even care for the sound of otherwise excellent singers like Mercury and Plant either. I know they were great, I just never cared for their tone, greatly preferring classic Gillan, Halford (Sad Wings of Destiny...that says it all imo), Coverdale..

    Post edited by Haffner on
  • Haffner said:

    Sometimes bands/entertainers hit people differently. This will sound bizarre, but I preferred QR when they were showing their Priest roots, which for me was the two songs I mentioned above. I just can't get into their other music, I was more into Fates Warning at the time. No doubt, Tate ended up losing his influences and became one of the Elite. His band just never did anything for me, and I believe me, I've actually owned (and sold) Mindcrime on cd twice. It bores the hell out of me (no offense meant to fans). Silent Lucidity was the final nail in the coffin for me and that band (not a big Pink Floyd fan, either).

    Also not a fan at all of Helloween, but Fiske is an excellent singer. Not one of my favorites (I was never wild about his tone).

    Keep in mind this is a (strange) person who didn't even care for the sound of otherwise excellent singers like Mercury and Plant either. I know they were great, I just never cared for their tone, greatly preferring classic Gillan, Halford (Sad Wings of Destiny...that says it all imo), Coverdale..

    I don't really listen much Queensryche or Power metal bands like Helloween much these days. When I listen to them, I like it, sometimes a lot. But I don't really get the need anymore. I listen to more Rainbow or MSG in comparison. I like everything Ryche did in the 80's and up to Empire (just like 4 songs on it but those I like I like a lot.). I don't think I have ever listened to a full Ryche album after that. I went to see them recently because they are only playing the old stuff, which I know I am gonna enjoy... With Ryche the older the album the more I seem to enjoy it. Heavier Ryche is a better Ryche.

    Both Tate and Kiske are among my definite favorites. No doubt about it. Even if I don't like the songs they are working with, I always find pleasure listening to their voices.

    I understand your words perfectly. I can listen to Mercury and Plant and like it, but as with the examples above, I seldom put a song by them. I appreciate Led Zeppelin, but I don't love it.

    I agree on your picks. My all time favorite singers as far as this genre of music goes are these dudes:

    Rob Halford
    Ian Gillan
    Ronnie James Dio
    Bruce Dickinson
    David Coverdale
    Geoff Tate
    Michael Kiske
    Graham Bonnet
    Klaus Meine

    Sometimes I like one more than the other, but on a general basis I like Halford more, and that is basically due to the strength of Sad Wings of Destiny, which by far features my all time favorite vocal performance. 70's Priest is untouchable to me, up to Unleashed in the East. Sad Wings is a milestone in metal music, and I have always considered it vastly underrated.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,805
    edited January 2017
     
    I agree on your picks. My all time favorite singers as far as this genre of music goes are these dudes:

    Rob Halford
    Ian Gillan
    Ronnie James Dio
    Bruce Dickinson
    David Coverdale
    Geoff Tate
    Michael Kiske
    Graham Bonnet
    Klaus Meine

    Sometimes I like one more than the other, but on a general basis I like Halford more, and that is basically due to the strength of Sad Wings of Destiny, which by far features my all time favorite vocal performance. 70's Priest is untouchable to me, up to Unleashed in the East. Sad Wings is a milestone in metal music, and I have always considered it vastly underrated.

    Those are amazing names. Sad Wings to me was only behind Child in Time (hard to top that imo) and Stargazer as the best Dino vocals of the 70s (well, at least my favorites). I'll never forget first coming across Sad Wings in a bargain bin (back in '78), being a little kid and being compelled by the drawing of the dark angel on the cover. I went home, put that vinyl on...and was freaked out. I couldn't believe Halford...like an always-on Gillan. I can't imagine what Tsangarides and the rest of the production team thought of his vocal on that album, they must have all felt sideswiped. I recall an actual opera teacher favoring Halford above all the above names, and even (if I remember correctly) remarking that she wished it were 1976 (or something) so she could just grab him and help him perfect his technique. She was bowled over.

    I think Sad Wings stands up with the best in Rock as a whole, not just because of the vocals (but those were a real benchmark imo).

    Post edited by Haffner on
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,701
    edited January 2017
    inmyhands said:
              
              If I asked for the 10 Best Heavy Metal Bands of the New Millennium would that help to focus your expertise on my problem?

    Rick,

    I tried to make a personal top 10 list of new millenium bands, but most of them featured (at least to some extent) death or black metal vocals, which are not your thing IIRC.  So, instead,  I thought of posting samples of current music where you might find more redeeming qualities (forgive the long post as I've included YouTube links, I tend to be excessive about things I love...) 

    1. The sound of Spiritual Beggars might « speak » to you. I think they’re by far the best ‘70s-inspired band out there, because they’re not overly litteral, they’re all excellent musicians and Michael Amott knows how to write SONGS. 




    2. I know you like instrumental guitar a la Vai, Satriani or Jason Becker. Maybe you already know Jeff Loomis.  Here’s a « younger » (that's very relative, he’s 45) shred guy who, IMO, stands out of the current crowd of shredders, because he really can write memorable stuff or venture into more extreme territories.  The videos below come from a project which is somewhat a death metal version of shred music. 


    3. I already mentioned Mastodon. Their early stuff is chaotic, but you might like their current era, which is much more based on traditional hard rock song structures, while retaining some psychedelic or sludgy elements.  Note that the two videos below feature either cats or butts, which, in both cases, represents a huge plus in my book.  On the downside, pretty much every live video I've seen of Mastodon was  underwhelming (never seen them in real ife, though). 


    4. There’s also Grand Magus.  More in a ‘80s vein, pure classic metal in the continuation of Dio-era Sabbath, Priest, Accept and others. Side effects may make you grow a viking beard. Just look at Joost. 

    Post edited by Seven Moons on
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,701
    edited January 2017
     
    Post edited by Seven Moons on
  • BytorBytor Posts: 1,547
    Led Zeppelin
    Black Sabbath
    Judas Priest
    Saxon
    Accept
    Van Halen
    Iron Maiden
    Metallica
    Megadeth
    Dio

  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,493
    edited February 2017
    Kiske has an ASTOUNDING low range as well. There's plenty of examples in the Helloween back catalog, but where he really shines is when he does his own thing. Like his Elvis covers...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA9Q3qy--EI
    Didn't know Kiske had the lower range.  He's a marvelous singer -- never said otherwise.

    My wife, the vocalist who can sing all of this stuff and hit all these notes better than most -- feels that in his prime, Tate had the "best instrument," from a vocalist's perspective. Even better than Halford's. Though Halford preserved his better, and Tate isn't what he was.   Granted, she doesn't know from Kiske (other than Halloween, which I play every October while carving the pumpkin).

    (your) Favorite is another question, and one of subjective taste.  One could make the case that Bruce's and Dio's vocal character beats anyone's range.
    Post edited by Dinosaur David B on
    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 9,324
    The example of Kiske singing in a lower range off the top of my head would be on the song "A Tale That Wasn't Right". He definitely did not sing in a low register often. He usually was mid range to high.

    Also in response to Kiske and Tate hitting the same notes and equating that to power. Hitting the same notes does not always equal power. I think it is with the volume and tone that you hit that note. To my ears Kiske had the edge in that department. Especially in comparing the live footage I have seen of both bands....where it really counts. 

    Not taking anything away from Tate at all. He was a more dynamic singer for sure.....and in that respect he had few rivals.
  • Duojett71 said:
    The example of Kiske singing in a lower range off the top of my head would be on the song "A Tale That Wasn't Right". He definitely did not sing in a low register often. He usually was mid range to high.
    Yeah, I'm familiar with that one. He really isn't that low on that one. He's just not up high where he usually lives.  And most of these guys are like that.  Tate goes lower than that, but he doesn't stay there much either.  I actually love when Halford uses the lower part of his range, and IMO, he doesn't do it enough. But it's great when he does.
    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
Sign In or Register to comment.