Favorite 12" Speakers by application.

Yes. I'm a crazed speaker explorer, investigator, OCD over anything concerning speakers.

I 'd like to list some of my favorite 12" speakers and hope you'll contribute your own thoughts on the matter.

#1 All purpose guitar speaker:

Flat response across the board allowing the earlier components of the signal chain to create the tone ..... Celestion Vintage 30.
A speaker that strongly contributes to and enhances the tone of the signal chain ..... Celestion G12H Anniversary.
A speaker that when driven to it's maximum breakup provides an ungodly wonderful tone ..... Celestion AlNiCo Blue.

#2 Hard rock voiced guitar speaker:

A speaker that can take a rather clean amp into true major hard rock territory .....Celestion G12H-75 Cream back.
A speaker that is massively loud and proud and will take a Marshall to "arena" tones .... Eminence Wizard.

#3   2 X 12" Speaker Combinations that just work perfect together:

60 to 120 watts ..... Celestion Vintage 30 / Celestion G12H-75 Cream back.
40 to 60 watts ..... Celestion Vintage 30 / Celestion G12H Anniversary.
Less than 40 watts ...... Celestion G12H Anniversary / Celestion AlNiCo Blue.


OK. Your turn.
«1

Comments

  • Rick, you may be the only one here who knows speakers intimately enough to make distinctions of granularity in the abstract. 

    If I was still using a 4x12, I'd load it with 30 watt Celestions -- probably the G12H Anniversary.

    But there are certainly other great speakers for different cab scenarios that I'm sure would sound great as well.


    Life is easier, so much easier, life is easier now.
  • SanchoSancho Posts: 18,145
    Speaker for home use : Celestion Greenback.
    Speaker for band use : Celestion G12T75

    That's as in depth as I get :#
  • Duojett71Duojett71 Posts: 8,198
    Probably my favorite speakers and the ones I have in my 2x12 at home are the Eminence Red Coat Wizards. Great for 70's and 80's hard rock and metal

    What I use in my 4x12 for the band are 2 Eminence Patriot Swamp Thangs and 2 Eminence Patriot Texas Heats. Great for very high gain music and lower tunings.....but they also sound good for cleans and classic metal. Each speaker is 150 watts if I remember correctly.
  • gqn_angelgqn_angel Posts: 1,289
    For my uses (hard rock/metal and some other cover applications), I primarily use 2x12s.  I'm also an Eminence fan.  Depending on the build/dimensions of the cab, I've enjoyed mixing and matching the following Red Coat speakers:  Lynch Super V12, Wizard, Private Jack, Manowar.

    It's a shame that Lynch ditched Eminence for the Celestion endorsement on the Lynchback (which I have not tried) and the Super V12 was discontinued because it is a wonderful, versatile rock speaker (inspired by the old Fane purple speakers).

    With the exception of the Alnico Blue (which in my fairly limited opinion is probably the greatest overall sounding speaker ever made) and the Greenback G12M, I just don't personally like Celestions (Vintage 30 being a nemesis of mine).  Flame suit on.
  • What do you guys think of Celestion G12H-30s? I have a 4x12 loaded with those. I use my Hot Rod Deluxe with it´s own speaker (Eminence? JBL? can´ remember) and I like it for what it is, but I have been wondering how it would sound with the 4x12, especially since i go for Marshall type tones via pedals anyway...
  • For my money, 4x12 cabs always sounded better loaded with 25w or 30w speakers, as they were in the 70s.
    Life is easier, so much easier, life is easier now.
  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,117
              No flame suit required. Both 4 X 12" cabs I owned, (one Marshall and one Mesa), were loaded with Vintage 30s. Back then Marshall 4 X 12" cabs came loaded standard with G12T75's. For an additional $200.00 you could get the Marshall cab loaded with G12M Greenback's or Vintage 30's. The 75's had too much breakup in the higher frequencies for my usage. The G12Ms sounded great for a very crunchy sound but I could not get them to sound good with a smooth over driven sound. By default, because I absolutely wanted a Marshall cab to stand in front of, I bought the cab loaded with Vintage 30s. They really didn't add anything tonally but were very versatile at producing whatever tones your guitar / amp / effects fed them.
              When I bought the Mesa it was either V30's or Custom 90's. Research told me the Custom 90's were Celestion Lead 80's tweaked for a bit more bass response to be used in open or half open back cabs. I wanted a closed back 4 X 12". Vintage 30's again.
              Over time I realized that what I was missing from my earlier cabs with 1 X 12" or 2 X 12" speakers was the speakers contribution to the actual tone. My first amps and amp cabs were always loaded with early Jensen AlNiCo P12R's or P12Q's. They didn't just reproduce what they were fed. The could actually contribute to the tone according to pick attack, increased drive or volume and whether the amp featured a tube or solid state rectifier. What they delivered actually changed depending on the the signal strength and type they received.
              The mid to late 70's, (and stretching well into the 80's, 90's and ..... fuck it .... forever), were a time of searching for speakers that would contribute rather than reproduce..The first option I found was the continued production of the Celestion AlNiCo Blue from the early days.  Ummmm ....... except they were priced way out of my range. Something at Jensen had changed and their production at the time sounded like cardboard trying to be silk. Ceramic was the standard of the day. The Celestion G12H30 was the first speaker with the cheaper ceramic magnet build I found that reacted like the earlier AlNiCo magnet models and added a "tighter" more defined note reproduction. Impressive. Weber also came to offer AlNiCo models that didn't break the bank and sounded damn good. Altec Lansing offered flat response speakers that sounded similar to later Vintage 30s and JBL produced guitar speakers that, while retaining a mostly flat response, extended the frequency range and sounded great with early Mesa Boogie builds that used the preamp to produce the overdrive / breakup sound earlier amp builds relied on the speaker to create. Celestion's Lead 80 sounded similar to Vintage 30's with added highs that helped a lead players contribution stand out in the live mix.
              Eminence was always hiding in the back round. They were mainly a company making OEM speakers for brand name amplifiers, (for just one example think "Fender Special Design"). This was the Eminence business model. Create a speaker that sounds similar to a Jensen, JBL, Altec, Celestion, etc. that will feature the name of the amplifier company on the back of the magnet. Over the long run Eminence stock piled a catalog of build and design information that became an excellent source of "all things speaker related". The "Legend" series was their first primary offering under the Eminence brand and it cultivated a small but loyal following. When Eminence decided to go "full boat" with their "Patriot", (American tone), and "Redcoat", (British tone), series they went "Balls to the Wall". Over the top reproductions of designs by other speaker manufacturers that either came in somewhat similar for much less bread, relatively close for less bread, near dead on yet still priced for less, or actually possibly topped the original model for certain applications, ( I offer the Governor, Swamp Thang, Texas Heat and Wizard as examples).
    Had I included 10" speakers in this post I would have stated that the finest 10" speaker I've ever played through is the Eminence Patriot "Ragin Cajun". The Eminence Redcoat 10" "Ramrod" is also a great choice to mix with the Celestion G10 Golds in a 4 X 10" cab. The Ramrod is a bit overly bright and defined while the Celestion G10 Gold is thick and rich with tone but could use a bit of definition. Combining two of each in a 4 X 10" is simply killer.

    I'm not owned by any brand. I know what I like. I currently own both AlNiCo and Ceramic speaker models built by Celestion, Eminence, Weber and Jensen. Speakers are important to me. Just like pickups and amplifiers and effects and guitars and world peace and the discovery of a suitable planet to allow our population to continue expanding as we go forth to conquer the universe and puppies that always look like they're smiling and the end of the holiday season and hard turgid nipples, (sorry. strike that.), and cars that make the driver feel like he owns the road and the smell of vanilla incense and, (if memory serves me right), Kona Gold!

     
  • gqn_angelgqn_angel Posts: 1,289

    That was an awesome "personal history" Rick--thanks!

    I think that you hit upon something important about Eminence that I also knew but did not actively think about:

    inmyhands said:
              
              Eminence was always hiding in the back round. They were mainly a company making OEM speakers for brand name amplifiers, (for just one example think "Fender Special Design"). This was the Eminence business model. Create a speaker that sounds similar to a Jensen, JBL, Altec, Celestion, etc. that will feature the name of the amplifier company on the back of the magnet. Over the long run Eminence stock piled a catalog of build and design information that became an excellent source of "all things speaker related". The "Legend" series was their first primary offering under the Eminence brand and it cultivated a small but loyal following. When Eminence decided to go "full boat" with their "Patriot", (American tone), and "Redcoat", (British tone), series they went "Balls to the Wall". Over the top reproductions of designs by other speaker manufacturers that either came in somewhat similar for much less bread, relatively close for less bread, near dead on yet still priced for less, or actually possibly topped the original model for certain applications, ( I offer the Governor, Swamp Thang, Texas Heat and Wizard as examples).
    Had I included 10" speakers in this post I would have stated that the finest 10" speaker I've ever played through is the Eminence Patriot "Ragin Cajun". The Eminence Redcoat 10" "Ramrod" is also a great choice to mix with the Celestion G10 Golds in a 4 X 10" cab. The Ramrod is a bit overly bright and defined while the Celestion G10 Gold is thick and rich with tone but could use a bit of definition. Combining two of each in a 4 X 10" is simply killer.

    While I am "newer" to "hot rodding" speakers than say, pickups, and I also am not married speaker-wise (like I may be to Duncan pickups), I think that your point above is why there is such an appeal about the Red Coat series (or at least the ones I mentioned to be to my liking in my previous post).

    For example:

    - The Private Jack was supposed to be "inspired" by the Greenback:  to my ears, close enough where the lower price of the Eminence is worth it.

    - The Manowar was modeled after the GT75:  I think that it sounds better with tighter bottom and mid-range than the Celestion.  Even adds a little 3D effect in a semi-open 1x12 combo (DSL401).

    So these are 2 examples where as you state, "relatively close for less bread, near dead on yet priced for less, or actually possibly topped the original model."

    I haven't had the chance but would love to try the Eminence Eric Johnson EJ12 and see how it stacks up to Celestion alnico speakers.

  • MAdXMAdX Posts: 1,894
    Are any of you guys familiar with the neodymium magnet speakers? I'm thinking about building a portable 1x12 cab and saving a kilo or two from magnet would really be great. 
  • gqn_angelgqn_angel Posts: 1,289
    MAdX said:
    Are any of you guys familiar with the neodymium magnet speakers? I'm thinking about building a portable 1x12 cab and saving a kilo or two from magnet would really be great.

    Sorry, still trying to properly figure out the quote function....

    I've heard and tried neo guitar speakers, but have never bought any for my own uses.  To my ears, they are pretty darn bright.  I actually like neo speakers for bass applications and have Eminence neodymium speakers in both my 4x10 and 2x10 bass cabs.

  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,117
    edited December 2016
    I'm not a fan of neodymium magnet speakers. To my ears they sound overly defined with little or no depth of "character"  or "mids" on tap. The tone sounds "stamped" rather than "developing" or "blooming". I don't like "modeling" amps but neodymium magnets might work with them. They create guitar tones manufactured from the get go and don't require individual component contributions. I'd consider using a Neodymium magnet speaker with my Yamaha THR10X modeling amp. It's the only "non tube" amp I own and it could probably make the necessary adjustments required to make the Neodymium sound good. Actually ... the YamahaTHR10X is the only modeling amp I've ever owned. Whether you go with the magnets or not ..... check out the Yamaha THR10X.
    Post edited by inmyhands on
  •  Anybody have any experience with Warehouse Guitar Speakers? They seem to get positive reviews and are
    reasonably priced. http://wgs4.com
    I also love Eminence.Wizards and Swamp Thangs.If there's a better speaker for metal than The Swamp Thang, I've
    never heard it.
  • i've never liked Vintage 30s, but i've never had a cabinet with truly broken in Vintage 30s, so maybe i don't know the whole story.  new, or semi-new, i think they're harsh and hard.  the 30w anniversarys are better.  my favorite speaker is the g12-65.  i like these for both closed back and combo use, Marshall, Fender, Boogie, whatever.  they just sound SO warm, and are very articulate and dynamic.  being a ceramic 65w speaker, they have a little headroom too, so they don't squash immediately.
  • TravisWTravisW Posts: 747
    I've been curious about WGS too. My main experience has been with Celestions, most of which I enjoy for different reasons and in different contexts. Ultimately, my faves are the Vintage 30 and the G12M greenback. 
  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,117
              I can't really help with the "warehouse" question. I've heard them "live" as well as being used in u tube videos but I've never owned them or had a chance to really get deeply involved. I've heard both good and bad about them but won't judge them. Personal experience is my usual source.
              When I was looking for a good 1 X 12" for recording modern tones I chose the Eminence Swamp Thang. My favorite 10" speaker for modern lead guitar work is the Eminence Patriot Ragin Cajun. My favorite speaker for Marshall arena rock tone is the Eminence Wizard. Other than those already listed I'm mainly a Celestion guy. Even the Fender Concert amps I use for my stereo setup sport a pair of Celestion G12H75 Creambacks on the left side and two 10" Celestion G10 AlNiCo X two Eminence Redcoat 10" Ramrods on the right side. My Bruno Underground 30 has a Celestion G12H Anniversary and a Celestion AlNiCo Blue,
Sign In or Register to comment.