About flamenco (followed from another discussion).

eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 3,600
[quote author=Snoogans link=topic=17588.msg264828#msg264828 date=1440061067]
[quote author=eduardoritos link=topic=17588.msg264824#msg264824 date=1440051845]
Sorry, Flamenco isn't the music from my homecountry (and, in any casi, I don't like at all).
That's what I have around: (This one, dedicated to diying mother).
[/quote]

That's pretty horrible!

So am I right in thinking that Flamenco is more common in Andelucia? That's the only part of Spain that I have visited.
I'm guessing that you must be from the North...
[/quote]

Avoiding Off Topicing the theard that's on...

Flamenco is a music born and raised in Andalucia.
A friend (the guy who has played the bass in our USA tour) is graduated in musicology, and Malaga born. Flamenco and rock guitar player.
He has a theory about that.

Gypsis are a tribe from Romanie, where 3 basic tribes of them lives. One is the romani (the people arrived to Spain in the 15th century, clayming the where Egipcians, where gypsi word comes from).
Spainsh autorithy wellcomed them assuming they where actual noble people from Egypt, but not.

They arrived to Andalucia where they where mixed with arabians (now cristianized) and that mixture has grow that music, flamenco.

That's a theory, but I think it's pretty close to the thrut.

Flamenco it's a rithmic music. With simple harmony (the basic spanish cadenza Am-G-F-E7), and sometimes mixed with some major chord changes.

Thay have the PALOS (palo=stick). Every palo is a rithm, mostly are 3/4 based). A group of bars, with some stronger beats, like a code. A palo = a code.

Some palo has a proper chord construction.

It's like Memphis blues, Chicago blues.... Similar chord structure, different rithm feel.

In the last decades of XX siecle, Paco de Lucia, a non gypsi guy (born to a Portuguese mother and spanish father), introduced many changes and influences in flamenco, starting with how he acommadated the guitar with the right foot supported by the left knee.
When traditonal flamenco people saw that, they hated and accused to go over tradition (tradition is very important to flamenco people).

I'm not a flamenco specialist, in part because I don't like it. The actual flamenco is very raw, not for "foreings" (being foreing any one not born and raised into it).

Post edited by jebbudda on

Comments

  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,777
    [quote author=eduardoritos link=topic=17623.msg265109#msg265109 date=1440660863]

    They arrived to Andalucia where they where mixed with arabians (now cristianized) and that mixture has grow that music, flamenco.

    That's a theory, but I think it's pretty close to the thrut.
    [/quote]

    Probably, yes. Some folk music from North Africa (precisely, algerian Chaâbi) sounds a bit like flamenco, but with different scales and instruments. I guess they have a common ancester.

    Without being a fan, I actually like some flamenco. I have a few CDs of traditional flamenco artists like La Niña de Los Peines, Pepe de la Matrona, Pedro Bacan. I also have an album of Camarón, with Paco de Lucia. The same person who recommended the other albums told me that Camarón and Paco de Lucia were "bastard" flamenco. I can see why in the arrangements.

  • SnoogansSnoogans Posts: 1,670
    Interesting!  :up:
    In my part of the world, it is automatically assumed that all traditional Spanish music is flamenco. Hope I didn't cause offence or anything!
    As an aside, I have visited Malaga several times. Love the place!
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 3,600
    [quote author=Snoogans link=topic=17623.msg265111#msg265111 date=1440662597]
    Interesting!  :up:
    In my part of the world, it is automatically assumed that all traditional Spanish music is flamenco. Hope I didn't cause offence or anything!
    As an aside, I have visited Malaga several times. Love the place!
    [/quote]
    Well, Spain (of better, Iberian peninsula) is very rich.

    The north-west part is gaelican (in fact that's the region named Galicia). Britains left Great Britain when they where invaded, in the V and VI centurys; part returning to the continet (Bretagne) and others in the north of Spain. They play a flute similar to the scothis flute.

    In the nord-pirenaic zone, whe're the basque people, with another langue, and musical tradition.
    Sad music in major key, about fishermans lost in the sea, or people emigrated to another worl (america).

    Raw, raw, whe have to go far away...

    The "jota" it's the music of the Ebro River, and improvised lyric, with standar structure (both musical and lyrical).

    Catalonian, in the north-east, with another langue, sister of french. With the cobla (little orquestra) playing the Sardana.

    The south is where flamenco lays.
  • M11M11 Posts: 840
    [quote author=eduardoritos link=topic=17623.msg265112#msg265112 date=1440663580]
    The north-west part is gaelican (in fact that's the region named Galicia). Britains left Great Britain when they where invaded, in the V and VI centurys; part returning to the continet (Bretagne) and others in the north of Spain. They play a flute similar to the scothis flute.
    [/quote]

    They even have bagpipes in Galicia (gaita gallega) if I'm not mistaken.
  • OskyOsky Posts: 1,056
    my apollogies too Ed, I was under the same illusion as Snoogans... pardon my ignorance!
  • SnoogansSnoogans Posts: 1,670
    [quote author=M11 link=topic=17623.msg265124#msg265124 date=1440688574]
    They even have bagpipes in Galicia (gaita gallega) if I'm not mistaken.
    [/quote]

    No-one should be allowed to have bagpipes!  :crazy:
  • SkyeSkye Posts: 1,661
    [quote author=Snoogans link=topic=17623.msg265133#msg265133 date=1440704375]
    [quote author=M11 link=topic=17623.msg265124#msg265124 date=1440688574]
    They even have bagpipes in Galicia (gaita gallega) if I'm not mistaken.
    [/quote]

    No-one should be allowed to have bagpipes!  :crazy:
    [/quote]

    Except this guy -  :smile:

  • I don't know anything about Flamenco, but I absolutely love Paco de Lucia, I think the man was and incredible player.
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 3,600
    [quote author=M11 link=topic=17623.msg265124#msg265124 date=1440688574]
    [quote author=eduardoritos link=topic=17623.msg265112#msg265112 date=1440663580]
    The north-west part is gaelican (in fact that's the region named Galicia). Britains left Great Britain when they where invaded, in the V and VI centurys; part returning to the continet (Bretagne) and others in the north of Spain. They play a flute similar to the scothis flute.
    [/quote]

    They even have bagpipes in Galicia (gaita gallega) if I'm not mistaken.
    [/quote]
    Yeah, that's the right word, not flute.

    And, very important, in the whole nord, whe have the cidre, the actual celtic beberage.

    [quote author=Osky link=topic=17623.msg265130#msg265130 date=1440699108]
    my apollogies too Ed, I was under the same illusion as Snoogans... pardon my ignorance!
    [/quote]
    No needed.
    I don't know a shit about music in Albania or any other country (except R&R).  :weed:

    [quote author=merlo_zeppelin link=topic=17623.msg265136#msg265136 date=1440714643]
    I don't know anything about Flamenco, but I absolutely love Paco de Lucia, I think the man was and incredible player.
    [/quote]
    Paco is one of that people who grab a thing and put it in another level (like Miles Davis or Eddie Van halen).

    I'd already poste this documentary. Don't find now the subtitled version
  • BreakfastimeBreakfastime Posts: 2,152
    [quote author=Snoogans link=topic=17623.msg265133#msg265133 date=1440704375]
    [quote author=M11 link=topic=17623.msg265124#msg265124 date=1440688574]
    They even have bagpipes in Galicia (gaita gallega) if I'm not mistaken.
    [/quote]

    No-one should be allowed to have bagpipes!  :crazy:
    [/quote]

    Q: Why do bagpipe players march when they play?

    A: To get away from the noise.
  • And that's what happens when a gipsy, after having played with Camaron, starts playing blues.

  • [quote author=merlo_zeppelin link=topic=17623.msg265136#msg265136 date=1440714643]
    I don't know anything about Flamenco, but I absolutely love Paco de Lucia, I think the man was and incredible player.
    [/quote]
    Paco is one of that people who grab a thing and put it in another level (like Miles Davis or Eddie Van halen).

    [/quote]

    :icon_syda: Love Paco de Lucia. I hate to make general statements but I imagine all women Paco de Lucia. And all women must also love Strunz and Farah.

    They aren't technically Flamenco either, but I am no expert on the genre so please don't mind my taking liberties.
  • [quote author=guitarrednfeathered link=topic=17623.msg265271#msg265271 date=1441145077]
    [quote author=merlo_zeppelin link=topic=17623.msg265136#msg265136 date=1440714643]
    I don't know anything about Flamenco, but I absolutely love Paco de Lucia, I think the man was and incredible player.
    [/quote]
    Paco is one of that people who grab a thing and put it in another level (like Miles Davis or Eddie Van halen).

    [/quote]

    :icon_syda: Love Paco de Lucia. I hate to make general statements but I imagine all women Paco de Lucia. And all women must also love Strunz and Farah.

    They aren't technically Flamenco either, but I am no expert on the genre so please don't mind my taking liberties.
    [/quote]
    It's dificult loving music and not loving Paco. He's above the genres.
  • jebbuddajebbudda Posts: 5,030
    True Flamenco is a pretty rigid genre .

    Paco caught shit from the purists . I saw an interview where he claimed he NEVER played improvised music until he got involved with Al D. & John McLaughlin .

    I'm a die hard fan of guys like Struntz & Farah .  :pray: I love the sound of nylon strings being shredded . Steve Stevens is outstanding too . The melodic shred these guys come up with is fantastic . Something about nylon strings adds so much drama and romance to the music .  I'm totally in love with it .
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