Sammy Hagar I Never Said Goodbye

13

Comments

  • iGougeriGouger Posts: 283
    My mom can't stand anything heavy metal ("I don't like how I can't understand what they're saying!"), but she doesn't mind "Van Hagar," or even the 1984 stuff, so go figure. :mrhappy: Like many of you said, VH with Roth vs. VH with Hagar are like two different bands. Sort of like Dio Sabbath vs. Ozzy Sabbath. Or Purple Gillan Sabbath for that matter.

    There's a lot of enjoyable stuff in either catalog IMO. My personal favorite though would have to be 1984 because I felt it struck a nice balance between the more abrasive edge of the early Roth-era VH stuff, and the melodic radio-friendly direction it anticipated. To use the words of Van Hagar, You get the "Best of Both Worlds," so to speak.

    One thing I'll say though is that I find it kind of funny how nobody's mentioned anything about Gary Cherone, for all the talk about VH. I guess VH3 didn't make much of an impression on you guys either? :roll:
  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    I actually thought VH3 was a good album, very good.  But, like nobody got behind it.  I thought Cherone was good and they should have done another album together.  I think most people equated it to Extreme on steroids and expected the more than words balladry, which was such a small part of Extreme.  Eddie and Nunos stules are also very different.  I still break that one out and play it, but in the VH catalogue, it is such a small drop im the bucket.

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

  • iGougeriGouger Posts: 283
    Hmm, in that case I will have to give it another listen. I remember listening to the whole album a couple times and not really being that moved by it, but I'll give it another shot.

    Will also be catching up on my Sammy Hagar listening (Montrose, solo work) today as well.
  • merlo_zeppelinmerlo_zeppelin Posts: 1,402
    Love Sammy, the guy has never stopped doing music, and he has a very consistent +40 year carrer. That's something not many can say. Still sings great (considering his age) he still sounds awesome on the records.
    I really dig Montrose and Van Hagar (though to be honest I liste to a lot more Roth-era VH), I really like Chickenfoot, a lot. I'm not very familiar with his solo stuff but I will check it out some day.
  • whoopass1whoopass1 Posts: 1,395
    [quote author=maybeyes link=topic=17350.msg261895#msg261895 date=1430908202]
    I actually thought VH3 was a good album, very good.  But, like nobody got behind it.  I thought Cherone was good and they should have done another album together.  I think most people equated it to Extreme on steroids and expected the more than words balladry, which was such a small part of Extreme.  Eddie and Nunos stules are also very different.  I still break that one out and play it, but in the VH catalogue, it is such a small drop im the bucket.
    [/quote]

    Even though I'm a HUGE Van Halen fan, I'm not a Fan of VH3. The problem isn't Cherone for me. The problem is, that the songs and riffs sound disjointed. There's nothing I can hold on to song-wise on that album. To my ears on that album, there was nobody in the studio telling Eddie which riffs were working and which ones weren't. Eddie is such a prolific player that he can sit there all day and crank out riffs. But he needs someone like, (on the early albums), Ted Templeman to help him edit down his flood of ideas into tangible songs. David Lee Roth was also a big part of the songwriting process, because he was the guy coming up with the lyrics & melodies to sing over Eddie's riffs. Then, when Sammy joined, since he was such an experienced songsmith, he was able to the help the band craft Eddie's riffs into even poppier tunes. When Cherone joined, it sounds to me that there was no one to help Eddie edit down his riffs.

    The ironic thing is that I saw Van Halen on that VH3 tour, and I thought Cherone sounded really good with them. But in the studio, it felt like SOMETHING was missing.
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,492
    yeah. SONGS.
    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • merlo_zeppelinmerlo_zeppelin Posts: 1,402
    Extreme does a pretty sick version of Mean Street

  • SkyeSkye Posts: 1,660
    [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=17350.msg261825#msg261825 date=1430750256]
    That's a great album.
    Sammy was just on the TV show Live from Darryl's House, ('cept they were in Cabo Wabo rather than Darryl Hall's upstate NY house).  Sammy's in his 60s and his voice still sounds awesome. He hasn't lost anything.
    [/quote]

    Yea I just saw that - it was great. They open with Rock Candy - one of my Fav Montrose tunes.
  • SkyeSkye Posts: 1,660
    [quote author=merlo_zeppelin link=topic=17350.msg261933#msg261933 date=1430958662]
    Extreme does a pretty sick version of Mean Street


    [/quote]

    That was great!!  :shred:
  • JoebuddhaJoebuddha Posts: 2,108
    I saw Van Halen on the Balance tour it was during the period when Ed was all chubby with the head.band and the goatee and Alex was in a neck brace. It was such a boring show, except for Sammy playing Eagles Fly.
  • otcconanotcconan Posts: 5,674
    The popular opinion is that Van Halen was better with Roth.

    This is slightly misconstrued.  The BAND, with Roth, had a different vibe and a totally party atmosphere that made it more fun.  Better, is debatable.

    Sammy joined in 1985 and 5150 came out in '86.  I can tell you, because I was in high school at the time:  EVERYONE had that album.  And if you watch the "Live Without a Net" video that followed, it was actually the moment in time when Eddie was truly at the peak of his powers.  Screw 1984.  His technique was at its peak in 1986.  It's undeniable.  Watch that video and see Eddie play all over "There's Only One Way to Rock," you'll see what I mean.

    Still, all things being equal, a far as Sammy goes, give me "Three Lock Box" and "Standing Hampton."
  • whoopass1whoopass1 Posts: 1,395
    [quote author=otcconan link=topic=17350.msg262378#msg262378 date=1432260074]
    The popular opinion is that Van Halen was better with Roth.

    This is slightly misconstrued.  The BAND, with Roth, had a different vibe and a totally party atmosphere that made it more fun.  Better, is debatable.

    Sammy joined in 1985 and 5150 came out in '86.  I can tell you, because I was in high school at the time:  EVERYONE had that album.  And if you watch the "Live Without a Net" video that followed, it was actually the moment in time when Eddie was truly at the peak of his powers.  Screw 1984.  His technique was at its peak in 1986.  It's undeniable.  Watch that video and see Eddie play all over "There's Only One Way to Rock," you'll see what I mean.

    [/quote]

    Sorry Man, I've gotta disagree with you here. When Sammy joined, Eddie started editing himself and playing with a bit more restraint than he had in the past....most likely due to the poppier material that they were writing with Sammy. And as far as "Live Without A Net" is concerned, that is definitely NOWHERE near his playing peak as far as I'm concerned. Just watch any bootleg performance from the "Fair Warning" tour....No Comparison. Eddie just had this FIRE about his playing when Roth was in the band. With Sammy, it was like somebody had pulled out a Fire Extinguisher. :silenced: Don't get me wrong, Eddie was still Great, but that certain edge wasn't there, that WAS there when Roth was fronting the band.

    Even Eddie's TONE started suffering when Sammy joined the band. That chorused sound on "Live Without A Net" wasn't nearly as cool as that RAW, cranked up, on the edge of meltdown, Marshall that you hear on "Van Halen" and "Fair Warning"....

     
  • otcconanotcconan Posts: 5,674
    Well,  I guess it's kind of hard to replicate the tone from "Unchained" live in pretty much any setting.

    As far as Extreme goes, I'm sorry but the overwhelming Queen fandom they displayed on "3 Sides to Every Story" pretty much seals it for me.  That was a cool album and I don't care what anyone else says.  "Seven Sundays."  That's totally John Deacon territory.
  • [quote author=maybeyes link=topic=17350.msg261828#msg261828 date=1430751390]
    That is a great album.  I recall an interview that Sammy gave where he said Ed did play some solos on the album, but I am not sure which ones made it onto the actual album.  This was when they were really good friends.  Sammy once mentioned that at first Eddie didn't want him to do this album, but Sammy had to fulfill his contract.  Some great tunes on this album.  One of my go to albums for Sammy
    [/quote]

    I think the only thing Ed did was play the bass and co-produce the album.  Hammer Falls Down is my personal favorite
  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    [quote author=Redrocker Fan link=topic=17350.msg267477#msg267477 date=1447206655]
    [quote author=maybeyes link=topic=17350.msg261828#msg261828 date=1430751390]
    That is a great album.  I recall an interview that Sammy gave where he said Ed did play some solos on the album, but I am not sure which ones made it onto the actual album.  This was when they were really good friends.  Sammy once mentioned that at first Eddie didn't want him to do this album, but Sammy had to fulfill his contract.  Some great tunes on this album.  One of my go to albums for Sammy
    [/quote]

    I think the only thing Ed did was play the bass and co-produce the album.  Hammer Falls Down is my personal favorite
    [/quote]
    I may have misread something then, but regardless Eddie did play bass and he coproduced the album.  I think Eddie did have an impact on Sammy's playing as he seemed to so much more proficient playing leads on INSG. 
    That in itself is kind of funny because Sammy was a good guitarist before, but he always let Gary Pihl, his lead guitarist in his band, do all the solos on the albums. 

    If you look at Sammy's pedigree, he always surrounded himself with good to great players.  So maybe it is not a surprise thet he tended to focus on songwriting.

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

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