Super Av in the house

124

Comments

  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,681
    The E.U. has leased us a starter version. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles but it did come with lots of cool little letters and stuff.
  • Metric is too logical to ever really catch on here.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • shred4Himshred4Him Posts: 159
    In America, the only people who make use of the metric system are drug dealers.  Figures.
  • [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=15725.msg239032#msg239032 date=1381803055]
    Congrats! Is it me or you don't seem to be as thrilled about it as you were expecting?
    It hasn't been instant, if that's what you mean. It's the kind of guitar that you have to get used to. It's not like just buying another Strat, or whatever. It doesn't feel like anything else I own -- a Strat, or a V, or anything else familiar. And I haven't really run it through a real rig yet for any length of time.  I'll have a better feel for it in a month or two. I won't really get a chance to play it through a full rig much till my band reconvenes for rehearsals last week of October. I guess what I'm saying is that I see and feel all the potential in it, but I haven't even begun to truly tap that yet.  But I'm very glad to have it, and looking forward to doing just that.
    [/quote]


    Best "I have a new guitar" quote EVER.
  • Well here I am a few weeks into the ownership, and I'm getting better on it, but I still find that my playing is a bit off on this guitar.  I think the trouble is coming from the different feel in the string tension and on the fret crowning.  

    I practice pretty much every week day on a MIM strat that kind of fights me on bends and such and has medium jumbo frets (which I dislike).
    When I switch to my Blackmocaster strat, -- which I've now has for almost 15 years, it's a breeze to play. It doesn't fight me. Bends are easier, and the super jumbo frets have a Richard Stanley rounded crown that I'm used to from having the same ones on my Les Paul for 25+years.

    Enter the SA.  The neck profile itself is no problem. Feels great. But the string tension is completely different on the 4 high strings because of the reversed headstock. I have super jumbo frets, but they have a flat crown, which feels different.  Bends are so easy, I'm bending too far. The frets feel slipperier some how. I'm still trying to get these things under control.

    I understand I'm comparing a guitar I now have maybe 10+ hours on to guitars that I have decades on, but I've owned other guitars (Hamer V, SG) and took to them faster.

    The key, is obviously more time.  I have a gig in less than a month with this guitar.  My plan is to schlep it to work every day and use it for my daily practice between now and the gig. That ought to help speed up the process.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • RED_SGRED_SG Posts: 2,058
    [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=15725.msg239964#msg239964 date=1383920621]


    Enter the SA.  The neck profile itself is no problem. Feels great. But the string tension is completely different on the 4 high strings because of the reversed headstock. 
    [/quote]

    I know James Byrd is very anal about every details on his SA. Is there a logical reason why he went for a reversed headstock?

    Hopefully you'll get used to it with time. I know that for myself, guitars in my arsenal that stood the test of time and became keepers usually felt natural after only a couple hours of playing. Good luck!
  • Is there a logical reason why he went for a reversed headstock?
    Absolutely, and once I'm used to it, it will be awesome.

    From the site
    The Byrd ™ 2 plus 4 ™ Equa-pull ™ Headstock design

    The ergonomic Super Avianti ® 2 plus 4 ™ Equa-pull ™ patented headstock is also a unique bit of engineering based upon experiance, reason, and an understanding of physics. While other manufacters have upon occasion, placed 4 tuning machines on one side of the headstock, and 2 tuning machines on the other, the Super Avianti's ® headstock is the only design which places the the four higher strings, into a reversed configuration.

    Why this is better:

    A standard 6 on-a-side headstock design (such as Fender's ®) creates several problems as a design: Because the wound strings are dependant upon a solid inner core and they are tuned lower, the wound strings are actually under lower tension than the unwound strings according to their true "modulus of elasticity".

    It is also known as a fact of physics, that when any string of a given pitch, has it's length increased, the actual tension required to maintain it's pitch goes up.

    This means that a standard 6 on-a-side headstock design is actually backwards, if the goal of the design is to equalize the tension between the strings. Mine is. Jimi Hendrix intuitively understood this, and chose to live with the akwardness of playing his guitar upside down for the benefit, because when the design is reversed, bending the higher strings becomes easier, and the tremelo arm has a more equal effective range between the strings.

    But there are also problems created when mearly reversing a standard 6 on-a-side headstock design: The nearly 8 inches of string length behind the nut on the low 'E' string, then requires that string retainers be placed over the wound strings to keep them from jumping off of the nut. This causes major tuning stability problems, especially when using the tremelo.

    The Byrd™ 2 plus 4™ Equa-pull™ Headstock design solves these problems, and places the four strings which are most commonly used to play chord voicings which the tremelo arm may be applied to, into the best configuration for optimal tremelo performance. A standard 6 on-a-side headstock design generally only provides 1/2 to one whole step range of pitch when using the tremelo arm. The 2 plus 4™ Equa-pull™ headstock design increases the available range of pitch change with the tremelo to a full musical fifth on the high 'E' string when using the tremelo. The lowered tension on the high 'E' string also makes string bending markedly easier than it is on a Strat ®.

    Placing the low 'E' and 'A' strings on the other side of the headstock eliminated any need for string-trees, while retaining the most useful elements and performance improvements of the left-handed tuner configuration on the 4 higher strings.

    You will also notice that the headstock is a "straight-pull" design, meaning that the path of the strings remains perfectly straight from the bridge to the tuning machines. This too eliminates any chance of the strings catching on the nut and creating tuning instability. Just to make certain, a super slippery graphite nut is employed. Between the improved string tension balance, lack of string trees, straight pull design, and graphite nut, the Super Avianti ® stays in tune without a locking nut. While the locking tremelo was a brilliant innovation, it made string changing a pain, and it had a negative effect on an instrument's tone. The improved equalization of string tension of the The Byrd ™ 2 plus 4 ™ Equa-pull ™ Headstock design also results in an instrument which feels better, and is easier to play.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • It has been 2 months since the last update. There have been Feints gigs, and photos from those events feature the SA.


    We need an update, sir. :)
  • I'm much more comfortable with the SA now.  Yes, I gigged with it, I recorded some clean electric and one solo with it that you will hear on an upcoming Feints track.  I think you all saw how cool it looked in the live photos.

    I purchased an SKB case/gig bag for a flying V http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/skb-v-type-guitar-soft-case  and the SA fits in it, so I can throw it over my shoulder and take it to work when I want to practice on the SA before a gig. Or FOR a gig itself.

    Otherwise, my initial thoughts are pretty much the same:

    Its best features are in the physical construction. The attention to detail in the body and the neck ensure that the guitar sounds really good acoustically (good sustain, great resonance), and that's the foundation for everything.

    It's also extremely good ergonomically, especially when standing. Light, fast neck, easy bending, great access up top.

    The electronics are sonically versatile, but not quite as much as I hoped it might be -- but that could be down to my pickup choices.

    There's certainly enough sustain, but I'll always wonder/imagine I could get more from a higher mass steel trem block.

    Similarly, the Vintage style tuners are OK, but any kind of sealed Grover/Schaller type would have been more efficient and slip less. The tuners on my $400 MIM strat hold their tuning better.

    Humbuckers would rule in the guitar, but it doesn't need them.

    I still haven't put any time in on the trem. It just doesn't seem important to my playing style, but we have another 6-10 new Feints songs coming, so we'll see.

    Overall, I'm enjoying it a lot, and in its stock form, I'd give it something like a 93 out of 100. And a couple of tweaks could get it to 100 easily, if I choose to go that route.

    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • Mike_HMike_H Posts: 769
    I think it looks like a great guitar, and obviously you are happy with it, but would you do it again? I mean by that is it what you imagined, or do you think you are just getting more used to it now?
  • It's pretty much as advertised, and I'm very glad to have it, but getting it made was not a fun process.

    And FWIW, you've got to understand -- if you're comparing it to stock, off-the-rack guitars, it's a whole lot better than most, and the price reflects that. But I'm comparing it to a 54 Les Paul with a Richard Stanley fingerboard/fret job, a custom-built Strat with with a Richard Stanley fingerboard/fret job, and a Hammer V custom made for Wolf Hoffmann. So if you guys were waiting for me to flip out and say: "Oh my god! It blows my other guitars away." Forget it. It doesn't. It is of comparable quality, though -- and worthy addition to the collection.

    I see it as being my #1 live/stage guitar.  As a studio guitar, it's just one of the four. Its big value there is that its stacked SC pups are much quieter than my Strat's true SCs. Its sonic versatility. It also has 22 frets which I really like.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • Mike_HMike_H Posts: 769
    That's an excellent point that I somehow forgot, you are comparing with some very high end instruments already. Sounds like it fits in there nicely. It will be nice to hear it on some of your recorded music. Actually will just be nice to hear some more of your recorded music anyway....
  • Coming soon. Thanks!
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • yngwie666yngwie666 Posts: 6,557
    [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=15725.msg242947#msg242947 date=1389476377]
    Humbuckers would rule in the guitar, but it doesn't need them.
    [/quote]
    Not tempted to try a JB Jr or a Hotrail in the bridge position ?  :evil:
  • Not tempted to try a JB Jr or a Hotrail in the bridge position ?
    You know, that could very well happen at some point down the road, as could a trem block and tuner upgrade, but at this point, I think I need to live with it a while.  I picked the pups it has off a spec sheet base on what I thought would closest match my strat, and I'l still trying to come to terms with what they are capable of, and what their true character is. I've adjusted the hight on them a few times and improved things.  It's not that I'm not getting good sounds.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
Sign In or Register to comment.