How Much Does A Songwriter Earn When Pandora Plays His Song 1.16 Million Times?

13

Comments

  • yngwie666yngwie666 Posts: 6,549
    Stupid question may be, but can any band open for a big name if you have the cash ?
  • JoebuddhaJoebuddha Posts: 2,107
    Yes.
    In NY anyway.
  • Wow. That the talent has to buy their way on to a stage with a national act says everything you need to know about the business these days. That is an appallingly remarkable state of affairs.
    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • lasm2000lasm2000 Posts: 137
    [quote author=inmyhands link=topic=15543.msg236448#msg236448 date=1376746936]
    If a DJ knows when and what to say I love having them around.

    Note to all DJs on the forum.  The band and song title should be said both before And After a song plays. God knows how many times I've flipped to a different station, found myself listening to something killer that I'd purchase if I knew what it was, waited for the end of the tune focused and ready to take down the info and instead found myself banging my head on the dashboard as the DJ introduced the next tune.  :pissed: :wall: :chainsaw:
    [/quote]

    Absolutely, it happens to me with an outrageous frequency. I shall add that SoundHound solved that problem for me, at least in many situations, but yes, song names should be said before and after songs are played, and preferably not on top of the solo at the end of the song that gets cut most of times  :ahhh:
  • yngwie666yngwie666 Posts: 6,549
    [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=15543.msg236862#msg236862 date=1377527684]
    Wow. That the talent has to buy their way on to a stage with a national act says everything you need to know about the business these days. That is an appallingly remarkable state of affairs.
    [/quote]
    You mean that if the son of Bill Gates would form a band with his school buddies, he could potentially open for the Rolling Stones in a stadium ?  :nuts:
  • JoebuddhaJoebuddha Posts: 2,107
    I don't know if I would take it that far, but that is the general gist of it.
    Pay for play didn't exist in NY when I was younger, I've only encountered it since I began playing with Awaken.
    It is really prevalent in the Metal scene here especially on Long Island.
    Plus it's been intimated to me that most of that money goes to the headliner.
  • I think that "thanks" to internet, music business, in his most part, is retourned to XIX century (and before) when most musicians did work in little venues, bars, clubs, teathers, earning a little money and some drinks.

    Other musicians are (where) big names/composers, with good clients (bach, betthoven...). Now, those could be composers to movies or tv big shows.

    Also, you can be a teacher, too.

    No more big bands, arenas, sales of millions. Maybe some rarities from youtube, but not the rule.

    It's in the first item (playing bands in bars) where always be the source of great music and ideas in rock. This circuit filters the groups and extends the name of good playing people, and rising them to bigger places.

    I'm one of these. I'm playing little gigs, enjoying the night and the little crowd, having some little money and good moments.
  • Andy GAndy G Posts: 996
    Spotify have FINALLY come clean... Artists earn $0.007 per play.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-25217353
  • yngwie666yngwie666 Posts: 6,549
    You would need a few hundreds of millions plays to get Sammy's car pool:
    image
  • MAdXMAdX Posts: 1,985
    Spotify has payed out $500 million in royalties this year. Remember that Spotify is not available in most countries outside Europe.

    I think they give a pretty good overview of their business here: http://www.spotifyartists.com/spotify-explained/

    In fairness I would be willing to pay more than €9.99 a month for Spotify Premium.

    Unfortunately it would be suicide for them to charge more since the competition is so tough. This competition has resulted in a great situation for the music consumers who can access millions of songs with just one click. Great for the consumers, not so great for the artists.

    However, I don't see this new era as the downfall of musicianship. Quite the opposite. With technology, people no longer need all the money and expertise that used to be the only way to get professional recordings. This is an amazing opportunity for all aspiring musicians.

    Streaming also offers a platform to distribute your music and make an income. Too bad that this income is nowhere near the income artists used to make from selling records (yet).

    I say yet because the music business is in a state of transition right now and I think there's still a lot of room for development.

    Though its unfortunate that right now the losers are the artists, I hope that streaming will be the death of big record labels and the artists in the end will get their fair share of the cake.
  • mr_crowleymr_crowley Posts: 6,579
    [quote author=MAdX link=topic=15543.msg241035#msg241035 date=1386413146]
    Streaming also offers a platform to distribute your music and make an income. Too bad that this income is nowhere near the income artists used to make from selling records (yet).

    I say yet because the music business is in a state of transition right now and I think there's still a lot of room for development.
    [/quote]


    I think you're hitting on the most important thing here. We have already been at rock bottom and things are slowly turning around and looking better... there is a long way to go and I doubt music ever will ever gross as much as it did in the late '90s but I am fine with that. I rather earn enough to buy myself a cheese burger than nothing at all.

    Give it some time, I think in 10 years, when I believe streaming will be the way we consume music almost exclusively this discussion about artists not getting paid enough won't exist 'cause you will be able to get by on the royalties from Spotify and their likes :up:
  • [quote author=Agrippa link=topic=15543.msg238670#msg238670 date=1380948985]
    Truth in shredding.
    Frank Gambale has his say:

    http://www.truthinshredding.com/2013/09/frank-gambale-spotify-in-my-mind-its.html
    [/quote]

    A couple of points

    The BBC report Spotify at 0.007 dollars per play whilst Frank quotes 0.0009 dollars,  Maybe there isn't a standard fee, but if his team have negotiated a return of 10% less than the average, then who's fault is that.

    He also seems not to realise that if we paid 10x as much as we do now ($100 per month), then he would still only be getting 0.009 dollars per play, even if the entire increase went to the artists.

    And who is going to pay $100 month?  Easy to answer, virtually no-one.   

    To me, cheap streaming is the answer to the piracy issues.  I cant be bothered to borrow and copy or ftp music between friends or go to free Russian download sites BECAUSE I CAN STREAM LEGALLY.

    If the cost of streaming was to dramatically increase, then people will stop using it and all the old piracy issues will just grow again and become the norm.




  • If the cost of streaming was to dramatically increase, then people will stop using it and all the old piracy issues will just grow again and become the norm.
    I wonder who would make out best in that scenario.

    The streaming companies would go under.
    The record labels and artists would have to deal with piracy again, but I bet they lose more $$ in the streaming scenario.

    If streaming went away, I WOULD go back to buying more albums, and yeah, occasionally someone copies something for me. But I'd listen to a lot less variety.  I get a whole of of music legally for $10 a month -- even if it is stiffing the artists.  :036:

    If you are an highly established artist that still moves a lot of physical media like the Stones, streaming can be another income stream (though other acts like Zeppelin and AC/DC don't do it, because they likely feel it would cut into their album sales).

    But if you're an unknown act:

    Streaming = giving your music away in return for exposure.

    And it doesn't work (much beyond friends and local fans) unless you get some kind of major PR Buzz -- of the kind created if you land a TV commercial.

    And even then, you probably have a better chance of going viral on YouTube.

    I think most unknown artists are probably better off NOT streaming through one of these services.
    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
Sign In or Register to comment.