Allan Holdsworth Appreciation Thread

HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,887
edited December 1969 in Off topic/NON-DINO Music Area
I know that Allan isn't a pureblood Dino by any stretch of the imagination, but no one can deny his influence on so many of our favorites.

I've been on a tear listening to him in the past six months and would love to hear other's thoughts on this incredible player.
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Comments

  • SkyeSkye Posts: 1,661
    He's ridiculous - from another planet.

    Most flawless legato technique in the history of the instrument.

    And a big influence on my fav - EVH.  :biggrin2:


  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,887
    [quote author=Skye link=topic=15374.msg233809#msg233809 date=1372803288]
    He's ridiculous - from another planet.

    Most flawless legato technique in the history of the instrument.

    And a big influence on my fav - EVH.  :biggrin2:



    [/quote]

    Oh I've cranked that particular video many times in the past year, Skye! :guitar:

    One of the things I've always loved best about Edward is how he would play outside, more often than most other classic Metal players. So when I first started reading about him mentioning Allan as a big influence I was delighted to discover where all this amazing dissonance came from!

    Of course I love them both dearly, fantastically inspiring players imo.
  • I don't really know where to start, lol.

    Allan Holdsworth is one of my absolute favourite players on the planet. He's one of the guys i go to when i want my ass kicked, or need the inspiration to pick up my guitar on those 'off' days.
    His 'Legato' technique and 4 finger per string approach have been well documented over the years, but for me, that's something i no longer think about. It's his fragmented approach to harmony, those ambiguous chord clusters, and his almost sheets of sound approach to line playing that really knock me on my ass.

    The way he often floats over the bar line when soloing is something that not a lot people actually do well (especially within the jazz/fusion genre/s). It's something you hear Coltrane, Wayne Shorter or even Miles do, but not that often guitar players. If they do it tends to sound rather haphazard (which has its place, too). He's able to just blow away with what would appear to be disregard for rhythmic placement and  yet is always able to come back in and pick up the beat when he feels like it.

    His Chord approach is also fascinating. Those stretch voicings, that while hinting at the influence of the jazz of old, in a way almost disregard all that came before. He's created this almost impressionistic approach to chord voicings that lend his music that air of unpredictability and ambiguity, and for a lot of people that can just sound unsettling, unresolved, and just downright shite, lol.

    For me, it's truly awe-inspiring stuff..
  • BreakfastimeBreakfastime Posts: 2,152
    Holdsworth is one of my favorite musicians , period.  In a league all to himself.  Been a listener for over 30 years--and actually sometimes think I understand what's going on in his music...I loove his chords more than the solos I think.  People always go on about the legato/shred factor influence on heavy rock but I think his chords are even more wicked.  Yeah, I'm a fan.  :notworthy:
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 3,593
    I own this book and I've studied a little. Enough to understand that he don't use armony in the way that almost everybody do.
    I think that he listens to a melody into his head, find it on the board and after tries to armonize it. And those "armonies" are little melodies too.
    After having do this... he tries to put scales and some logic into the song.

    That's what most amazes me, more than his technique. His free vision of music.
    image

    Surprisgly, the introduction to this book is an essay about beer, beer making and his invention of a beer server and his own beer brand.
    Many pics of him and friends and beers.

    :drinkin:
  • eduardoritoseduardoritos Posts: 3,593
    Chord voicings, ala Holdsworth.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,887
    [quote author=eduardoritos link=topic=15374.msg233822#msg233822 date=1372836388]
    That free pdf can interest you:
    https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/26952/AllanxHoldsworthx-xReshapingxHarmony.pdf?sequence=2


    [/quote]


    Great links, Eduard! Also great are the Alfred "Allan Holdsworth" video (the dvd-ized version of the original REH vhs tape), and accompanying book, "Just For the Curious". Highly recommended.
  • SkyeSkye Posts: 1,661
    [quote author=eduardoritos link=topic=15374.msg233822#msg233822 date=1372836388]
    That free pdf can interest you:
    https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/26952/AllanxHoldsworthx-xReshapingxHarmony.pdf?sequence=2


    [/quote]

    Wow dude that's an interesting find - a musicology major's Master's thesis on Holdsworth! Cool!
  • Dr NickDr Nick Posts: 3,605
    Have you heard this?



    Derek Sherinian's 3rd solo album. Yngwie was busy, so he approached Alan Holdsworth.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,887
    [quote author=Dr Nick link=topic=15374.msg233916#msg233916 date=1372938269]
    Have you heard this?



    Derek Sherinian's 3rd solo album. Yngwie was busy, so he approached Alan Holdsworth.
    [/quote]


    I usually can't stand Sherinian (based a great deal on his elitist garbage attitude, I know very dumb of me and no offense to fans), but this is cool! He shoulda used Holdsworth for the whole album though imo.

    I'm once again blown away by Allan's note/scale choices here.
  • Dr NickDr Nick Posts: 3,605
    I guess it's availability as much as anything else. I like some of Derek's solo stuff, not everything, but I LOVE this tune. And I also really like the stuff he DID get Yngwie to play on, which to me shows what "Y" is capable of with the right guidance.

    Dammit...
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,887
    [quote author=Dr Nick link=topic=15374.msg233921#msg233921 date=1372942976]
    I guess it's availability as much as anything else. I like some of Derek's solo stuff, not everything, but I LOVE this tune. And I also really like the stuff he DID get Yngwie to play on, which to me shows what "Y" is capable of with the right guidance.

    Dammit...
    [/quote]


    I feel your pain, Doc.
  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    I think Holdsworth is an incredible guitarist.  My fave album of his is still Metal Fatigue.  I love how he colours outside the lines.

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,887
    [quote author=maybeyes link=topic=15374.msg233943#msg233943 date=1372963820]
    I think Holdsworth is an incredible guitarist.  My fave album of his is still Metal Fatigue.  I love how he colours outside the lines.
    [/quote]

    I was just listening to that one, great stuff.\

    One thing I noticed, watching Allan's REH video, is how he really doesn't play strictly hammer-ons and pull-offs by any means (though he is the king of that technique and motivated guys like VH, Satriani, and Vai to master it).

    He picks a lot more than one would think, especially if one was only familiar with his recorded stuff alone. I think for Holdsworth, his super legato style is meant more in a conventional, even-the-picking-flows-seamlessly way.
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