What´s On Your Night Stand ? (what are you currently reading ?)

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  • VenomboyVenomboy Posts: 3,601
    Game of Thrones 1st book
    Lots of the recent Hellboy comics
    League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Century 2: 1969
    Latest Wired, Fast Company, and a Fortune (I think) Steve Jobs tribute issue
    Latest Guitar World

    On the bookshelf waiting:
    Linchpin by Seth Godin
    Ozzy biography (hey it was on sale)
  • JoebuddhaJoebuddha Posts: 2,108
    Jen,
    Bukowski is one of my favorite authors and he isn't a hard read.
    They actually made a movie out of Factotum with Matt Dillon as Bukowski and they did a really great job.
    I've never attempted Nietzsche though, I did just read Philosophy for Dummies though!
  • rjg350rjg350 Posts: 598
    John Sandford - Buried Prey
    Brad Thor - Full Black
  • IsaacIsaac Posts: 3,088
    Recently I've read:

    The Millennium Series- surprisingly dark and interesting read. I thought it was going to be akin to Twilight or something.
    Flowers For Algernon
    The Catcher in the Rye
    A Deepak Chopra book, forget the name.
    What We Keep
    The Visible Man- A subtle, creepy novel about morality, voyeurism, and the Self. The author Chuck Klosterman, is an entertaining music writer as well.



  • MAdXMAdX Posts: 1,985
    The Essential Hemingway. It contains extracts from his most famous novels. I think I'm gonna pick up For Whom the Bell Tolls after this one.
    Any other recommendations?
  • AgrippaAgrippa Posts: 5,872
    [quote author=MAdX link=topic=12887.msg196306#msg196306 date=1319093652]
    The Essential Hemingway. It contains extracts from his most famous novels. I think I'm gonna pick up For Whom the Bell Tolls after this one.
    Any other recommendations?
    [/quote]
    "The Old Man And The Sea" is one of the few Hemingway novels that I´ve actually been able to finish.
    So, that´s the Hemingway novel I can recommend.

  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,701
    [quote author=MAdX link=topic=12887.msg196306#msg196306 date=1319093652]
    The Essential Hemingway. It contains extracts from his most famous novels. I think I'm gonna pick up For Whom the Bell Tolls after this one.
    Any other recommendations?
    [/quote]
    It depends on what you're looking for in Hemingway's work. He's always a terrific storyteller with a reporter's eye, but while some of his novels are more focused on action/adventure/war/testosterone, some other ones are more reflective, personal or disturbing.

    While I enjoy about everything he's done, I'm more into the second category. I warmly recommend:

    The Sun Also Rises - Hemingway's best work IMO. The novel follows a group of people from the so-called "lost generation" on their trip from Paris to Pamplona where they attend the San Fermin feria, circa 1925.  There's a former WWI reporter made impotent by a war wound, his extremely loose fiancée, a former lover of said fiancée, a matador, and prostitutes - among other characters.  I won't spoil the plot, but there's a lot of different topics in it: love affairs, alcoholism, redemption, as well as captivating journalistic depictions of events and places.  

    A Moveable Feast - the personal account of Hem's life in Paris during the '20s when he was a poor young writer among other intellectual expatriates, most of whom would later become (or were already) famous. Charming rendition of a lost era's atmosphere.

    The Garden of Eden - a story describing the insidious deterioration of a marriage, featuring a weird erotic triangle, and ambiguous sexual identities. Not his best (it was released posthumously and the editors probably did some butchering job with the manuscript), but with a surprising --somewhat feminine-- psychological approach, and unusual topics for a writer who was supposed to be all about boxing, war, hunting and big pairs of balls.

    I also second Agrippa's recommendation for "The Old Man and the Sea". A short, timeless, classic.
  • MAdXMAdX Posts: 1,985
    [quote author=Seven Moons link=topic=12887.msg196311#msg196311 date=1319102342]
    [quote author=Agrippa link=topic=12887.msg196308#msg196308 date=1319094903]
    [quote author=MAdX link=topic=12887.msg196306#msg196306 date=1319093652]
    The Essential Hemingway. It contains extracts from his most famous novels. I think I'm gonna pick up For Whom the Bell Tolls after this one.
    Any other recommendations?
    [/quote]
    "The Old Man And The Sea" is one of the few Hemingway novels that I´ve actually been able to finish.
    So, that´s the Hemingway novel I can recommend.
    [/quote]
    It depends on what you're looking for in Hemingway's work. He's always a terrific storyteller with a reporter's eye, but while some of his novels are more focused on action/adventure/war/testosterone, some other ones are more reflective, personal or disturbing.

    While I enjoy about everything he's done, I'm more into the second category. I warmly recommend:

    The Sun Also Rises - Hemingway's best work IMO. The novel follows a group of people from the so-called "lost generation" on their trip from Paris to Pamplona where they attend the San Fermin feria, circa 1925.  There's a former WWI reporter made impotent by a war wound, his extremely loose fiancée, a former lover of said fiancée, a matador, and prostitutes - among other characters.  I won't spoil the plot, but there's a lot of different topics in it: love affairs, alcoholism, redemption, as well as captivating journalistic depictions of events and places.  

    A Moveable Feast - the personal account of Hem's life in Paris during the '20s when he was a poor young writer among other intellectual expatriates, most of whom would later become (or were already) famous. Charming rendition of a lost era's atmosphere.

    The Garden of Eden - a story describing the insidious deterioration of a marriage, featuring a weird erotic triangle, and ambiguous sexual identities. Not his best (it was released posthumously and the editors probably did some butchering job with the manuscript), but with a surprising --somewhat feminine-- psychological approach, and unusual topics for a writer who was supposed to be all about boxing, war, hunting and big pairs of balls.

    I also second Agrippa's recommendation for "The Old Man and the Sea". A short, timeless, classic.
    [/quote]
    Sweet!

    The Sun Also Rises was actually included in its entirety and I thought it was brilliant!

    The reason to why I found the extract from For Whom the Bell Tolls to be particularly interesting is the year I spent in Barcelona and the insights into the Spanish civil war I got there. I've also read George Orwell's Homage to Catalonia on the same topic, which I can warmly recommend.

    I will also try to check out the stuff you mentioned here, thanks!
  • [quote author=Joebuddha link=topic=12887.msg196296#msg196296 date=1319067233]
    Jen,
    Bukowski is one of my favorite authors and he isn't a hard read.
    They actually made a movie out of Factotum with Matt Dillon as Bukowski and they did a really great job.
    I've never attempted Nietzsche though, I did just read Philosophy for Dummies though!
    [/quote]
    I've never read his books or poems and always had him on my back-burner list.  I actually had Ham on Rye in my hand at a used record/book shop a couple months ago but put it down because I spotted a Nina Simone double disc and was short on cash.  I should have gone with Bukowski because the Nina Simone was not the collection I would have put together.
  • I think it might be more fun to ask the female members what's in their nightstand.  :evillaugh: :evillaugh:

    Just finished Faulker's "As I Lay Dying".  Starting up "Sanctuary", then plan to re-read "Light in August".  I'll probably be completely Faulkner-ed out by then.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,803

    Back to "Thus Spoke Zarathustra"
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,701
    [quote author=guitarrednfeathered link=topic=12887.msg196344#msg196344 date=1319135450]
    [quote author=Joebuddha link=topic=12887.msg196296#msg196296 date=1319067233]
    Jen,
    Bukowski is one of my favorite authors and he isn't a hard read.
    They actually made a movie out of Factotum with Matt Dillon as Bukowski and they did a really great job.
    I've never attempted Nietzsche though, I did just read Philosophy for Dummies though!
    [/quote]
    I've never read his books or poems and always had him on my back-burner list.  I actually had Ham on Rye in my hand at a used record/book shop a couple months ago but put it down because I spotted a Nina Simone double disc and was short on cash.  I should have gone with Bukowski because the Nina Simone was not the collection I would have put together.
    [/quote]
    Yes, you should have gone with Bukowski :evil: Among his novels/short stories, my fave is "Women", but I also like "Tales of Ordinary Madness" a lot. I love the peculiar sense of humour and self-derision permeating through his crude depictions of life and human relationships. I've never read his poetry, though.
  • [quote author=Seven Moons link=topic=12887.msg196357#msg196357 date=1319148894]
    [quote author=guitarrednfeathered link=topic=12887.msg196344#msg196344 date=1319135450]
    Yes, you should have gone with Bukowski :evil: Among his novels/short stories, my fave is "Women", but I also like "Tales of Ordinary Madness" a lot. I love the peculiar sense of humour and self-derision permeating through his crude depictions of life and human relationships. I've never read his poetry, though.
    [/quote]

    MAN, I always have a list of 100 things waiting to be read. But yes, for sure; I'd go with the novels first and then probably his non-fiction and finally to his poetry if I thought it might do something for me.

    [quote author=DaveinSF link=topic=12887.msg196352#msg196352 date=1319143839]
    I think it might be more fun to ask the female members what's in their nightstand.  :evillaugh: :evillaugh:
    [/quote]
    :offtopic:
    The [b]winner![/b]  ....I can't BELIEVE it took this long, I thought when I read the original post for the first time that I was going to see this a lot sooner.
    :chuckle:
  • inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,591
    "In" my nightstand I have a pad and pen, my cell phone charger and a well used Harrison Ford Han Solo Halloween mask that's on like it's seventeenth rubber band.
  • Just finished The Worst Hard Time by Tim Egan, nonfiction, about the dust bowl in the Great Depression.

    Whenever you're in a FML mode read that, and you'll realize how good you've got it.
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