What to do in case of BURNOUT???

CaparisonCaparison Posts: 247
edited December 1969 in Songwriting
hello dudes.
I have a problem. because I have no musicians as friends I decided to ask you.
I am 28 years old. last few months (8-10) I play only covers or shitty riffs which comes to my mind.
When I was 22 I was on fire and could write one song almost every day.
Now I spend a lot of time at work. When I am at home I have no inspiration to play guitar.
I move my fingers on the same frets with the same chords and structure. IT SUCKS.
I never played in a band, because in this town there are only few musicians and the most of them don't take music seriously.
I have my head down because of NOT playing in a band. But there are so many guys on the net who play alone very cool stuff.
What should I do to write groovie and rad stuff as I did in the Youth? Or am I just burned out forever?
I'm thinking about selling my guitars because of my not creative being.
Hope my english was good enough to explain what happen in my mind.
Please guys help. :arg:

Comments

  • VandenbergVandenberg Posts: 3,871
    Dont give up my friend, I personally would seek out band, I know you say it is not easy, but this would fire you up no end imho, as for the guys who play on their own on the net, yes there are some very good ones out there, but to me they and it, all seems a little "sad". Don't sell your gear, pick some really challenging stuff you have always wanted to learn, maybe seek out a good teacher to improve your skills, a band if possible, then give your self 6 months or so and see where you are. Good luck and keep rocking man.
  • EugenicScumEugenicScum Posts: 5,321
    Get into new music. Discover 10 good new albums a month.

    Go on a musical pilgrimage and see a lot of bands of your kind live.

    Learn new stuff to do on the guitar. You'll have more ideas beginning to form in your head.

    Have a beater of an acoustic guitar lying around in your living room. Fuck around with it while watching TV, hanging out with guests. Also very useful to immediately transcribe ideas in your head to the guitar.

    Join your local/regional online music communities, and socialise, contribute and interact. Look for people to talk music with, drink with, and hopefully play with. I didn't know a single music-type guy till I was 20. Then I found online communities like this, and local ones. Majority of my social interaction occurs with the music-type people now. I've formed a band now using these contacts. I hire for my not-at-all-related business through these contacts. Socialising is so important, and I'm not at all good at it, so you can do better.

    Buy better equipment, if your gear doesn't inspire you.

    Get a home recording set up in place. Get a decent audio card, ezdrummer, an SM57, pro-tools, get guitarpro as it's easy to tab on that and export midi, figure out how to record on your own. Start with some of your own favourite songs from your past.
    Check out my band: Bevar Sea
  • Dinosaur David BDinosaur David B Posts: 17,486
    As for direction: I too, would recommend home recording.  For me, it's a lot less headaches and a lot more rewarding than trying to be in a band.  When inspiration comes, it's a very satisfying outlet to be able to take a song from inception to finished product.

    Minimally, if you don't get into recording with a computer based system, get some kind of drum or jam machine you can play along with when you're alone.

    For being in a playing rut: take a few lessons and learn some new things -- whatever they may be. Tell a teacher: "I'm in a rut. What can I learn to shake myself out of it." 

    As for a songwriting rut, pick up an acoustic guitar.  They force you to play differently, and the ideas you'll come up with on acoustic will be completely different from the ideas you have on an electric.


    I ain't falling for no banana in the tailpipe.
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,799
    [quote author=EugenicScum link=topic=10833.msg165511#msg165511 date=1280398772]
    Get into new music. Discover 10 good new albums a month.

    Go on a musical pilgrimage and see a lot of bands of your kind live.

    Learn new stuff to do on the guitar. You'll have more ideas beginning to form in your head.

    Have a beater of an acoustic guitar lying around in your living room. Fuck around with it while watching TV, hanging out with guests. Also very useful to immediately transcribe ideas in your head to the guitar.

    Join your local/regional online music communities, and socialise, contribute and interact. Look for people to talk music with, drink with, and hopefully play with. I didn't know a single music-type guy till I was 20. Then I found online communities like this, and local ones. Majority of my social interaction occurs with the music-type people now. I've formed a band now using these contacts. I hire for my not-at-all-related business through these contacts. Socialising is so important, and I'm not at all good at it, so you can do better.

    Buy better equipment, if your gear doesn't inspire you.

    Get a home recording set up in place. Get a decent audio card, ezdrummer, an SM57, pro-tools, get guitarpro as it's easy to tab on that and export midi, figure out how to record on your own. Start with some of your own favourite songs from your past.
    [/quote]

    +1 Great post, terrific advice. For me, guitar and guitarists are all part of feeling like a kid again. My fiancee told me that I go through phases: I'll break out my old Black Sabbath cds and just go on an Iommi kick, buying vinyl and posters, playing old songs, etc. Then it will be Van Halen (it's currently Fair Warning worship), maybe Ulrich Roth next, then Accept/Hoffman.  I'll just go crazy, buying up cool stuff by one of my heros, playing their licks, just remembering how great it was when I first heard their playing. That whole "keep feeling fascinated" thing.

    Also, coming here on the Dino forum, with alot of people who like the same music I do, can be quite the inspiration.
  • StevilStevil Posts: 3,334
    EugenicScum said... :up:
  • AgrippaAgrippa Posts: 5,872
    Well... I have never experienced burnout on playing the guitar, as such.
    I´m often angry with my own lazyness, but have learned to live with and accept that personal trait.

    You can ALWAYS practice more, better, more effecient and so forth, but when I don´t feel like playing the guitar, I don´t and it never lasts more than a day, before I enjoy my guitars again.

    Bands however, I often reach a point where I feel that my creative input isn´t valued enough, and I want to do something else...

    I´m at that point regarding my band right now, but I have decided to give it until newyear, and if things doesn´t change, well...

    At least we´ll have to have some bandmeetings..
    :chuckle:
  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    I think you have a lot of good ideas here that people are giving you.  To get yourself writing again you need to kickstart the process.  Learning some new stuff does that.  I had a friend that actually decided to learn more jazz and that kickstarted him and he was great to begin with.  It forced him to think differently and in turn he applied that to his playing and songwriting.  Really cool.  It takes moving a little outside of your box and then you will be back in the game again.

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,799
    [quote author=maybeyes link=topic=10833.msg170081#msg170081 date=1287140562]
    I think you have a lot of good ideas here that people are giving you.  To get yourself writing again you need to kickstart the process.  Learning some new stuff does that.  I had a friend that actually decided to learn more jazz and that kickstarted him and he was great to begin with.  It forced him to think differently and in turn he applied that to his playing and songwriting.  Really cool.  It takes moving a little outside of your box and then you will be back in the game again.
    [/quote]


    This approach has helped me a lot. Recently I took a few days completely off of guitar, then I heard the Bach Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin. I bought the scores and started playing along and memorizing the Sonata in G minor. Immediately, I got interested in playing again, and I started today back in earnest. Hearing those pieces for the first time got my gumption up again, it really works.
  • BreakfastimeBreakfastime Posts: 2,152
    Home recording is always good.  Before you know it, you've been sitting there for four hours playing guitar.  

    AND you have recorded proof!  :metal:


    Another thing that really helps is: get yourself a student.  I don't mean 'quit your job and become a guitar teacher' I just mean, find yourself somebody, a neighborhood kid, an old friend, whoever.  Just find somebody who wants to learn to play, but never thought they could do it.   Show 'em the most basic stuff and see their excitement when they make their first chord chaange, or finally get the riff to "Pretty Woman" right.   This always seems to bring me back to whatever it is that drew me into music in the first place.

    Guys like us, we take guitar playing for granted because we've done it so long.  Seeing somebody experience that thrill is pretty inspiring.
    Plus, it makes you think about the physical and musical aspects of guitar playing, because you're explaining it out loud.  Simple stuff that we take for granted, like how open chords are uniquely voiced, or why you want to finger something a certain way, suddenly become "Oh wow!" moments all over again once you start revisiting them.
  • AgrippaAgrippa Posts: 5,872
    I talked with a good friend yesterday, in fact he is the bassplayer from my teen age band, some 30 years ago,
    He is a MD, a neurologist in fact, and we started talking about practising and rehearsing, and he had the opinion, which sounds logical enough to me, that when you "burn out" (at work, relationships, the Gym, education, whatever where you´d think it´s stuff you´d really want), it is simply put, when the tediousness /boredom exceeds the "rewards", or the rewards are so far off in the future that they are "abstract".

    That´s really it imho.

    So sometimes when you "burn out" it is really because your Brain (which at all times IS you) can´t see or feel the rewards.

    So you´ll have to find the "spark" that made you want to practise in the first place, and cultivate that.
    Rekindle the fire so to speak. H
    ow to do that is individual, sometimes you´ll just need a new and good guitar, sometimes you´ll need a reason for practising; a gig, a band, a new song whatever, and sometimes you´ll just got to admit to yourself that it just isn´t FUN anymore.
    If you made your "identity" around beeing "the guitar guy" for a lifetime, or just your entire youth, this can be very hard, but in the end, the only one that CAN reward you, is yourself, and the goals YOU put up, and you got to be "true" to yourself.
  • yngwie666yngwie666 Posts: 6,551
    I went through that phase. Then I took guitar lessons with a pro player and it showed me that there was a big room from improvement in my playing and I got a lot of challenging stuff (and also basic) to learn and play.
    Another option, if you're already really good and really bored, take so time to listen to Chubtone's CD and transcribe it into Guitar Pro tab for me. Thank you.  :biggrin2:
  • otcconanotcconan Posts: 5,674
    Do what I did the past year.  Quit playing guitar (for the most part), start dating, get your life in order, and then have an '80's metal tribute band knock on your door and invite you to play keyboards and guitar.  :)

    Worked for me.
  • I agree with getting outside of your comfort zone musically when you are in a rut.  I went through a period like that and ended up studying jazz for a couple years.  It was a great experience - turned me on to a lot of cool music I probably wouldn't have discovered otherwise, and forced me to work on parts of my game that I had been neglecting, which was primarily rhythm.  I was a decent Dino pocket player, but once I started throwing syncopation into the mix, I realized I needed a lot of work rhythmically. 

    Are there any styles of music besides rock you like?  Country?  Rockabilly?  Latin?  Jazz?  Classical?  Funk?  Fusion?  Sometimes playing music with a different rhythmic structure can make a difference because your old comfortable licks won't fit and you have to try something else.  It might open some doors in your playing, and will probably develop your rhythmic vocabulary.  Also, a lot of these styles require a clean tone, which will help your chops by taking away the crutch of distortion. 

    Once I got back into rock playing, my solos were much, much tighter rhythmically, and also had more of a sense of direction and purpose.  I rarely play jazz any more, but I am glad I worked on it for a while.

  • Wow, you got a lot of great advice here.  I think you are NOT ready to pack it in just yet or you wouldn't be lurking around here and asking for advice.  If I were you, I'd read through all these posts and see what speaks to you.  Don't force it though; you'll want the advice/method for sparking your interest to speak to you.  You don't want to chase something around and feel  like it's a chore. Dip just a toe in for a while and let the wave come get you. 
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