Very Best, any genre, Guitarist CD of the Last Decade.

inmyhandsinmyhands Posts: 11,653
I've not had a guitarist focused CD affect me this much since either Eric Johnson's "Ah Via Musicom" or Satch's "Surfing With The Alien" hit the market. Brad Paisley's "Play" has been in my car stereo for almost a year and a half. I sometimes take it out to play something else, but, at least three out of five days "Play" is what I'm listening to.

The more I listen to it the more I appreciate the skill on the instrument this man has. Most folks think of Brad as a country singer / songwriter who happens to play a Tele type guitar. The "Play" album has revealed that he is, in fact, one of the finest guitarists I"ve ever heard. It would be no stretch at all to include Brad within the ranks of Chet Atkins, Eric Johnson, Al Di Meola, Joe Satriani, etc..  The touch and control exibited on "Play" is nothing less than masterful. Perfection of natural bends as well as use of a B bender, tonal affections to die for, everything from a feather-lite touch to a claw on the strings. Various harmonic types, string skipping at the "Johnson" level, and multiple "right hand" techniques equal to the fretboard dance of the left.

This is an album every single guitarist in the world should own. Damn the choice of style or preferred techniques.........Brad is a guitarist of the highest caliber. If you prefer Dino or Jazz or Blues or Fusion or Vintage Rock or Country or whatever.......If you're a true lover of the electric guitar and want to hear a true master on the instrument you can't do any better than this cd.

Many of the songs on the disc are "tributes through style" to other great guitaists. One song evokes the best of Robben Ford. Another is Eric's "Cliffs" rendered in a song that mirrors yet transfers from 335 to Tele.

On top of Brad's own skills he has invited many of the historically best Tele players to join him on the "Play" album. I don't feel like I'm going overboard in recommending this album to every single member of this forum as well as any guitarists you might know who are not members. Don't pay attention to the style. Just listen to his fingers. Those fingers are singing guitar tones and demonstrating techniques that any guitarist I've ever met would give his eye teeth for.
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Comments

  • SanchoSancho Posts: 18,678
    At the risk of repeating myself : Loomis. Zero Order Phase beats the pants out of anything that has guitars on it.
  • Seven MoonsSeven Moons Posts: 8,797

    Hands down: Uli Jon Roth "Transcendental Sky Guitar"  (released in 2000, so I presume it still qualifies for the last decade). 

    More recently, there's Chris Poland's Ohm: "Circus of Sound". 
  • AgrippaAgrippa Posts: 5,943
    My four candidates:

    Jeff Loomis - Zero Order Phase
    Uli - Transcendental Sky Guitar
    Michael Schenker - Adventures of the Imagination
    Jeff Beck - Live at Ronnie Scotts



  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    Have to say Play as well.  It makes regular trips back to the player and since I listen to most stuff at work, it is played a lot there.

    Still need to get the new Beck.  Heard a lot of good things, but I always forget about it when I am out.

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

  • I'm a little schizophrenic with my taste......
    Agree with Uli John Roth and Trancendental Sky Guitar.  Absolutley.
    I'll add Vinny Moore- To The Core
    And when I finish peeling through all the Buckethead stuff I'll add one of those too.
  • I'm with inmyhands and maybeyes.


    I've listened to Paisley for years because:

    a) Tele players rule,
    b) he's a gearhead and thinks the playing is as important as the pop appeal, and interviews with him get me excited about gear and playing
    c) he's a phenomonal player.

    I was really psyched to hear Play was coming out, and it didn't disappoint in the least.

    Oh, and "Huckleberry Jam" is now my theme song.
  • maybeyesmaybeyes Posts: 4,522
    [quote author=A.J. Huckleberry link=topic=10052.msg154464#msg154464 date=1267104476]
    Oh, and "Huckleberry Jam" is now my theme song.
    [/quote]

    :biggrin2: :rotflmfao: :hmm:
    So is this a dedication to Huckleberry - do you know Brad AJ?  :rotflmfao:

    Never mistake a clear view for a short distance.

  • If Adventures of the Imagination was indeed in 2000, put me down for that one. I love that album, and it contains (IMO) Schenker's last A+ level lead moments.

    I think the best guitar album I can think of in recent years, but doesn't qualify cause it was released in 99, was Jeff Beck's Who Else.
    In the midst of the sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.
  • What a weak decade.  By far the worst.
  • SanchoSancho Posts: 18,678
    [quote author=Smoking Guns link=topic=10052.msg154485#msg154485 date=1267121092]
    What a weak decade.  By far the worst.
    [/quote]
    Have you bothered to check any of the new bands we've tried to promote around here?
  • Does it have to be instrumental??? cause I've really liked Whitesnake's Good to be Bad, Paul Gilbert`s United Stated and Richie Kotzen's Peace Sign
  • [quote author=Sancho link=topic=10052.msg154490#msg154490 date=1267124135]
    [quote author=Smoking Guns link=topic=10052.msg154485#msg154485 date=1267121092]
    What a weak decade.  By far the worst.
    [/quote]
    Have you bothered to check any of the new bands we've tried to promote around here?
    [/quote]

    Yes, there is some great stuff for sure, but in comparrison to the 70's or 80's the songs don't match the guitar virtuosoness...  ha.
  • JoebuddhaJoebuddha Posts: 2,125
    For Rock it's Paul Gilbert and Freddie Nelson - United States.
    I can't think of any other Rock album  I've heard that was released in the last ten years that lit me up like that album has guitar wise.
    There have been other things where maybe I'll like one or two songs but that album as a whole is just bad-ass.

    Terre Des Hommes and Live at Barbes Brooklyn by Stephane Wrembel.
    In the last 4 years Stephane has been the biggest direct influence on my playing and writing.
    I took about a half dozen lessons with him and jammed with him maybe 3 or 4 times since then and he always imparts some little insight that just sends me searching for months.

    The last ten years for me have been about going back and checking out stuff I missed the first time around. So back in like 2001 - 02 I borrowed a friends copy of Burn and he never got it back. That album, the first four Aerosmith albums, Bon era AC/DC, led me to DRG.
    DRG led me to check out Uli era Scorpions, Gary Moore, Thin Lizzy, and a thousand other bands.
    The last few years it's been Gypsy Jazz, Flamenco , Classical and lately Bulgarian wedding music and Country.
    So yeah... thats where I'm at.
  • JasonJason Posts: 1,931
    [quote author=Dinosaur David B link=topic=10052.msg154480#msg154480 date=1267118762]
    If Adventures of the Imagination was indeed in 2000, put me down for that one. I love that album, and it contains (IMO) Schenker's last A+ level lead moments.
    [/quote]
    Agreed!  :up:
  • HaffnerHaffner Posts: 7,920
    Uli Jon Roth "Metamorphosis", though I'm not a big Vivaldi enthusiast. I only wish there had been more of Uli's compositions on that cd, and not Baroque variations. I liked "Transcendental Sky Guitar", but the Hendrix worship was a big turn off. First runner up: Jeff Beck - Live at Ronnie Scotts.


    Second Runners Up: I really liked the blow it out there approach of Ralph Santolla on the last two Deicide and Obituary albums, also Alex Skolnick was terrific (as usual) on "Formation of Damnation". Loved Tony's ultra-tasty playing on "Devil You Know", though I realize that would be an unpopular vote.

    I must be weird, I'm not a fan of Loomis.
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